PhD in Kinesiology and Nutrition Student Handbook


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PhD in Kinesiology and Nutrition Student Handbook
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT CHICAGO
July 2021

Contents
Introduction .............................................................................................................................. 3 Program Administration and Faculty ......................................................................................4 Curriculum Overview ...............................................................................................................5 Required Course Work .............................................................................................................5 Required Thesis Credits............................................................................................................6 Annual Evaluation.....................................................................................................................6 Preliminary Exam......................................................................................................................6 Purpose of the preliminary exam .............................................................................................6 Timing of the preliminary exam...............................................................................................6 Preliminary Exam committee...................................................................................................7 Format of the preliminary exam...............................................................................................7 Grading of the preliminary exam ........................................................................................... 10 Proposal defense ..................................................................................................................... 10 Dissertation defense ................................................................................................................ 11 Academic advising ...................................................................................................................12 Academic policies and procedures..........................................................................................12 Graduate college policies and procedures ..............................................................................12 Grading and Grade Point Systems...........................................................................................12 Registration ..............................................................................................................................13 How do I register for classes? ..................................................................................................13 Add and Drop Policies .............................................................................................................13 Cancelling Registration........................................................................................................... 14 Students with Disabilities and Accommodations.................................................................. 14 Religious Holidays .................................................................................................................. 14 Graduation Policies and Procedures ...................................................................................... 16 Guidelines Regarding Academic Integrity ..............................................................................17 Probation and Dismissal Rules............................................................................................... 18 Professional and behavioral expectations .............................................................................. 18 The Student Disciplinary Policy ............................................................................................. 18
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Professionalism ....................................................................................................................... 19 Student Health ........................................................................................................................ 19 Statement on Sex Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, and Sexual Misconduct................. 19 Discrimination ........................................................................................................................ 19 Incident Report Form .............................................................................................................20 FERPA (Federal Educational Rights and Privacy Act)...........................................................20 Program policies and procedures...........................................................................................20 Class Attendance......................................................................................................................21 Financial responsibilities .........................................................................................................21 Graduate Basic Tuition & Fees ................................................................................................21 Financial Aid ............................................................................................................................21 Student resources....................................................................................................................22 Student Nutrition Association................................................................................................22 Academic Support & Achievement Program (ASAP) ............................................................ 23 AHS Student Council .............................................................................................................. 23 Graduate Student Council ...................................................................................................... 23 African American Academic Network ................................................................................... 23 Campus Advocacy Network.................................................................................................... 23 CampusCare - Student Health Benefit Program....................................................................24 Counseling Center ..................................................................................................................24 Dean of Students Office..........................................................................................................24 Latin American Recruitment and Educational Services (L.A.R.E.S.)....................................24 Student Advocacy Services .....................................................................................................24 Student Ombuds Services.......................................................................................................24 Student Legal Services ............................................................................................................ 25 U and I Care Program ............................................................................................................. 25 Writing Center ........................................................................................................................ 25 Veterans Affairs.......................................................................................................................25 Preliminary Exam Grading Rubric ...........................................................................................0
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Introduction
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT CHICAGO COLLEGE OF APPLIED HEALTH SCIENCES AND GRADUATE COLLEGE
DEPARTMENT OF KINESIOLOGY & NUTRITION
The faculty and staff of the University of Illinois at Chicago Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition join in welcoming you. We are very pleased that you have selected the PhD in Kinesiology and Nutrition (KN PhD) to pursue your graduate education and training. The Student Handbook was developed to familiarize you with the program policies and procedures which you are required to follow while you are a student enrolled in the KN PhD. This Handbook is not intended to be all-inclusive, but rather, to be used as a supplement to the UIC Graduate Catalog. Furthermore, this handbook is meant to provide KN PhD students with a description of the standards and policies of the Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition. Each student is encouraged to review the handbook thoroughly and to retain it as a source of ready reference. The policies and procedures provide a basis and a rationale for fair and equitable treatment of all program participants. The handbook provides the framework within which the Program Director, University faculty and staff, and students can work together effectively. The policies and procedures described are current as of the publication date and are subject to change without advance notice. July 2021
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Program Administration and Faculty

Department Head Kelly A. Tappenden, PhD, RDN Professor Email: [email protected] Director of Graduate studies Giamila Fantuzzi, PhD Professor Email: [email protected] Graduate Faculty Tracy Baynard, PhD Associate Professor Email: [email protected] Eduardo E. Bustamante, PhD Assistant Professor Email: [email protected] Bo Fernhall, PhD Professor and Dean Email: [email protected]
Kharma C. Foucher, MD, PhD Associate Professor Email: [email protected]
Mark D. Grabiner, PhD Professor E-mail: [email protected] Timothy J. Koh, PhD Professor E-mail: [email protected] David X. Marquez, PhD Professor Email: [email protected] Vanessa Oddo, PhD Assistant Professor Email: [email protected] Andrew Sawers, PhD Associate Professor Email: [email protected]
Zhenyuan Song, PhD Professor Email: [email protected] Lisa Tussing-Humphreys, PhD, RDN Associate Professor Email: [email protected] Krista Varady, PhD Professor Email: [email protected]

Kinesiology and Nutrition Office Staff: Randal T. Stone Email: [email protected] Juan Gonzalez Email: [email protected]
All Graduate Programs at UIC are administered by the Graduate college https://grad.uic.edu/

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Curriculum Overview
REQUIRED COURSE WORK
The KN PhD degree is personalized to the specific interests and goals of each student. Therefore, there are no required classes for this degree. Students work with their assigned advisor to design coursework that fulfills their specific interests and goals.
When designing their personalized coursework in consultation with their advisor, students should keep in mind that completion of the KN PhD degree requires 64 credits at the graduate level for students with a prior Master’s degree and 96 hours at the graduate level for students without a prior Master’s degree. Only 400- and 500-level courses can be applied to the degree. Credit toward a graduate degree is only given for courses in which a student received a grade of A, B, C, CR, or S. At least 48 semester hours beyond the Master’s level or its equivalent must be taken at UIC.
Any 400- or 500-level class offered by any program at UIC counts towards the KN PhD degree as long as it’s directed at complementing Nutrition- or Kinesiology-related knowledge. For example, students interested in in public health-related issues can take classes from the UIC School of Public Health, students interested in clinical applications can take classes offered by the Department of Physical Therapy or Occupational Therapy as well as the UIC Schools of Dentistry, Medicine, Nursing, or Pharmacy, students interested in the anthropology or sociology of Nutrition can take classes from the Anthropology or sociology programs, etc.
No more than 12 semester hours of credit earned as a non-degree student can be transferred into the degree program. Only graduate-level courses in which a grade of A orB was earned will be considered.
Doctoral students may transfer in no more than 25 percent of the hours required for the degree. This limit is for courses taken as a student in another college at UIC or another institution, but not coursework taken in a different program within the Graduate College at UIC. Transfer credit is considered only for courses in which the student received a grade of A or B. Credit earned more than six calendar years before admission to the Graduate College is not usually accepted for transfer.
A minimum of 9 credit hours of 500-level courses must be letter-graded courses (A to F), not project, thesis, or independent study, or seminar courses that are graded Satisfactory (S) or Unsatisfactory (U).
Students who are full-time are expected to maintain a course load of at least 12 credit hours per semester.
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Graduate course descriptions for all programs are at https://catalog.uic.edu/gcat/
The Schedule of Classes is at: https://ossswebcs4.admin.uillinois.edu/PORTAL_UIC/myuic/classschedule.html
Note: Curriculum is subject to change from time to time. It is up to the candidate to ensure they have completed the most recent requirements.
REQUIRED THESIS CREDITS Students must earn at least 32 hours in KN 599 or HN 599 (PhD Thesis Research).
ANNUAL EVALUATION A Doctoral Student Review Committee, appointed by and advisory to the Director of Graduate Studies, will solicit information each fall semester from every doctoral student, and will evaluate the student’s progress. Based on the Committee’s report, the Director of Graduate Studies will communicate to the student and his/her advisor any recommendations or other actions.
PRELIMINARY EXAM PURPOSE OF THE PRELIMINARY EXAM Graduate College rules states: “The purpose of the Preliminary Examination is to determine the candidate’s readiness to undertake dissertation research, and passing it constitutes formal Admission to Candidacy.” See https://grad.uic.edu/academicsupport/exams-defense/ for more information.
In the KN PhD, the goal of the preliminary exam is to assess comprehensive knowledge of areas of scholarship related to the student’s dissertation topic, including background knowledge, ability to generate novel hypotheses, as well as understanding of research design, methods, measurements, statistics and principles of research ethics.
TIMING OF THE PRELIMINARY EXAM The Graduate College states: “The preliminary examination is generally administered during or near the end of the time the student has completed most, though not necessarily all, of the coursework, but has not made a major investment of time and effort towards the dissertation research project. A minimum of one year has to elapse before the defense of the dissertation after passing the preliminary examination. Only students in good academic standing are permitted to take the examination.” See https://grad.uic.edu/academic-support/exams-defense/preliminary-exam-policies-andprocedures/ for more information
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In the KN PhD, it is highly recommended that the exam is completed by the end of the 3rd year, although it can occur earlier or later as judged appropriate by the advisor and student. During the annual review process feedback is provided to students and advisors regarding the projected timing of the preliminary exam.
PRELIMINARY EXAM COMMITTEE
The Graduate College states: “The committee for the preliminary examination is appointed by the Dean of the Graduate College upon the recommendation of the department or program. The committee consists of at least five (5) members, of whom at least three (3) are UIC Graduate Faculty with full membership, and two (2) of whom must be tenured. The chair of the Committee must be a full member of the UIC Graduate Faculty. An outside member is recommended but not required.” See https://grad.uic.edu/academic-support/exams-defense/preliminary-exam-policies-andprocedures/ for more information
The Committee Recommendation form is at https://uofi.app.box.com/s/lqoh181bm8ihv0thg8cbb9f1ozdspn1f and must be submitted to the Graduate College at least 3 weeks (preferably 5) before the expected date of the oral component of the preliminary exam. In the KN PhD, the student’s advisor acts as the Chair of the Committee. The Committee Recommendation. CV for all non UIC committee members must be attached to the form.
FORMAT OF THE PRELIMINARY EXAM
The preliminary exam includes two components:
1) written component 2) oral component.
The oral component takes place approximately two weeks after submission of the written component to the exam committee.
Written component.
There are three options for the written component of the preliminary exam. Students work with their advisor and committee to decide which of the three options is best for them. For each option, the student chooses topics for the preliminary exam that are related to the topic of their dissertation (see details for each option below). The advisor helps guide the student toward the exam’s topics. Prior to the exam, the student must obtain agreement from the committee that the topics selected are appropriate for the preliminary exam. The written component must be submitted to the committee at least two weeks prior to the scheduled oral component.
OPTION 1. GRANT PROPOSAL
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The student prepares a grant proposal on a topic related to their dissertation. The grant format follows the guidelines for the NIH Kirschstein Predoctoral Individual National Research Service Award (https://researchtraining.nih.gov/programs/fellowships/F31) or similar grant mechanism.
During preparation of the proposal, students may consult with their advisor and committee. Consultation on general issues (clarification, technical advice, etc.) is appropriate, but solicitation regarding ideas for specific aims or experimental design is inappropriate. The dissertation advisor and committee may give written feedback on drafts of the proposal but should not write any portion of the proposal.
If the grant proposal option is selected, it is highly recommended that the student take the Grant writing course offered by the department before taking the preliminary exam.
OPTION 2. SCHOLARLY ARTICLE
The student writes either one full-length review (for example, narrative, scoping or systematic review) or one primary research article directly related to the topic of their dissertation. If a primary research article is selected, the article should be based on data primarily obtained and/or analyzed by the student.
The topic, format, length and structure of the article should be defined in advance in consultation with the student’s advisor. Prior to writing the article, the student should obtain the consent of the committee by submitting to the committee an outline of the proposed article.
The style of the article should follow the guidelines of a relevant peer-reviewed journal selected by the student in consultation with the advisor. The article should be presented to the committee in a format that would be submittable to the selected peer-reviewed journal.
During writing of the article, the student may consult with their advisor and their committee.
OPTION 3. RESPONSES TO QUESTIONS
The exam covers three thematic areas related to the student’s dissertation topic. The areas are defined/selected in advance by the student in consultation with their advisor with input from the committee. It is advisable that students begin to identify these areas as early as possible during their doctoral study. Prior to the written exam, the student must obtain agreement from the committee that the topics selected are appropriate for the preliminary exam.
Prior to the written component date, the advisor solicits questions from committee members. Questions should be directly related to at least one of the three thematic areas selected. Questions should emphasize the student’s ability to synthesize information,
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interpret research findings, formulate hypotheses and design experiments. Students should discuss specific content areas with each committee member at least once prior to the written component and are encouraged to meet as needed. Specific examples of questions from previous exams should be provided to the student if requested.
The total number of questions provided and minimum/maximum number of questions to answer will be decided upon by the advisor and committee; however, a minimum of three questions should be answered. The advisor/committee should be mindful of the time allotted to the student when developing the questions so they can be completed in a reasonable time frame.
Students have the option of completing the written component in a one-day or two-day format.
1. One-Day option: Students will be given 8 hours to complete the written component, with all questions presented to the student at the beginning of the day.
2. •Two-Day option: Students will be allowed 4 hours to work on their written component each day. A set of questions is presented to the student on day one and a different set of questions is presented on day two.
Oral component.
The oral portion of the exam takes place in front of the convened committee (in person or virtually, as agreed upon by the committee and the student) in closed session, approximately two weeks after the written component is completed, and at the latest one month after completion of the written component. Waivers to the one-month rule can be requested to the DGS should circumstances require it.
The oral portion of the exam builds around the written component. The oral component may start with a brief presentation (no longer than 10 minutes) by the student that summarizes the content of the written component of the exam, particularly for students who selected the grant or scholarly article option. The examiners, having read the written component in detail, then ask questions that can be both directly related to and tangential to the written component. The purpose of the oral component is to further assess the student’s understanding of their area of scholarship, including background knowledge, ability to generate novel hypotheses, understanding of research design, methods, measurements, statistics and principles of research ethics.
The typical time devoted to the oral component is two hours.
Once the oral component is completed, the committee deliberates an outcome in closed session without the student present.
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PhD in Kinesiology and Nutrition Student Handbook