NestlÉ Professional Sustainability Magazine No Time To Waste


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Planetpro NESTLÉ PROFESSIONAL SUSTAINABILITY MAGAZINE
NO TIME TO
WASTE The Restaurant’s Role
in Reducing Trash

Waste by

Unpacking

the Numbers the Problem

The Leftover Dilemma

welcome to
PLANETPRO

Nestlé is always looking for ways to bring you a brighter future. At Nestlé Professional, our goal is to support our customers in the food service industry, helping to share insights and knowledge of the emerging trends, important issues, and best practices you need to Make More Possible.

Building upon the great feedback we’ve received for our Nutripro magazine, which focuses on nutrition, health, and wellness, we are extending the same level of support to another issue that affects all of us: sustainability. Therefore, we are proud to launch a new magazine that will be published every year: Nestlé Professional’s Planetpro.

This magazine will cover a range of environmental topics that are closely tied to the food service business. By sharing this information, we aim to help you find ways to reduce your business’s environmental impact and work together to protect the planet.

We know that our industry is facing severe challenges during the pandemic. Nestlé Professional is deeply engaged in supporting all customers throughout the restart. We know that sharing, joy, celebrating, and living will never stop. We are here to support you and are always open for you.

We hope you enjoy this first issue.

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WORKING
waste TOWARD ZERO

IT’S TIME TO STOP ADDING TO LANDFILLS.
How much waste does your business produce? Even for the environmentally-minded among us, when you start to add up everything you throw away on a weekly basis, the answer may be surprising.

There are many reasons to cut back on waste. It is clearly one of the right things to do in terms of protecting the environment: our planet has limited resources and we need to use them wisely if we want them to last for generations. Moreover, it can save your business money—which is more important than ever in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

And finally, reducing waste is important to your customers. That means it should also be important to you if you want to attract new guests and keep the ones you have.
In this issue, we’ll take a hard look at this topic and show you some practical ways you can manage waste throughout your

workflow, from delivery to food prep and disposal. We’ll help you understand how to spot waste, what contributes to it, and how you can introduce better practices that reduce waste in every part of your business. Let’s get started.

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waste by the
NUMBERS

FOOD SERVICE
WAS RESPONSIBLE
FOR OVER
25% OF THE 931
MILLION TONNES
OF FOOD WASTE
GENERATED IN 20191
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70% OF WATER USE
WORLDWIDE
IS USED FOR
AGRICULTURE
IRRIGATION2
SO WASTING FOOD
=WASTING WATER

8MILLION
METRIC TONS
OF PLASTIC END UP IN THE OCEAN
EACH YEAR3
­–ENDANGERING FISH, SEA BIRDS,
AND OTHER
MARINE LIFE

14% ONLY
OF PLASTICS
ARE RECYCLED
YEARLY 4

40% END UP IN
LANDFILL

32% LEAK INTO THE
ENVIRONMENT

14% ARE BURNED
FOR ENERGY
RECOVERY

WASTE
PREVENTION
SOLUTIONS HELP
RESTAURANTS
INCREASE
PROFIT BY
$620
MILLION
EACH YEAR5

78%
OF U.S
CONSUMERS
SAY THEY HAVE
TRIED TO REDUCE THEIR VOLUME OF
FOOD WASTE
IN 20206

FOR EVERY
DOLLAR
SPENT ON
FOOD WASTE
REDUCTION,
RESTAURANTS
CAN YIELD
$8 IN COST SAVINGS7

28% OF CONSUMERS HAVE AVOIDED DINING OUT DUE TO CONCERNS ABOUT SUSTAINABILITY8
THAT PERCENTAGE IS EVEN HIGHER (48%) FOR 18-24 YEAR OLDS

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E / FREEZER FRIDG

A UNPAC KING

DAIRY

PAGE 10

D MEALS PREPARE
D STORAGE COL

CWOLD ROAOSTE
M
B OIL
IN THHEEN KIT1C2
PAGE

Average Energy Consumption in a Full-Service Restaurant in the U.S.9

35% Food Preparation

CFOOD WASTE PAGE 14

Refrigeration
6%
Lighting
13%

28% HVAC
Sanitation
18%

WASHING

WHERE ENERGY IS USED
To avoid wasting energy, choose efficient
equipment and keep it well maintained, rely on natural lighting
and LEDs as much as possible, minimize the
time that cooler and freezer doors are open, and turn off appliances
when not in use.

from
DOCK to dining room
Tackling the problem of waste requires big-picture thinking. In the next few pages, we’ll walk through every stage in your process from unpacking to serving the meal, targeting key areas where you can reduce or eliminate waste along the way.
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PAPER PLASTIC GLASS ORGANIC

D ROOM DIN7ING PAGE 1 Planetpro by Nestlé Professional® 9

unpacking WASTE PROBLEMS

From ingredients to paper goods and cleaning supplies, most of the items that your business purchases will arrive in some type of packaging. To reduce packaging waste, strive to follow the three Rs of sustainability.

REDUCE
Ask suppliers to use sustainable packaging materials or minimize their packaging, using just enough to protect ingredients en route. You can also order in bulk when possible so you have fewer cartons and less plastic wrap to dispose.

REUSE
Instead of single-use packages and wraps, ask for refillable or reusable containers like kegs, plastic crates, and tarps. Once containers are empty, set them aside in a designated space until the supplier can pick them up again.

RECYCLE
Look up your local ordinance to see which materials can be recycled and how they should be cleaned and sorted. Then train staff accordingly, making sure they know recycling is important. You can make the process easier by designating collection areas. Arrange for pickup or dropoff of materials on a regular basis to keep your business clean and uncluttered.

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GREENHOUSE 10,11 GAS EMISSIONS
PER KILOGRAM OF FOOD

Beef 60.0 kg

Lamb 24.0 kg

Pork 7.0 kg

Poultry 6.0 kg

Eggs 4.5 kg

Milk

3.0 kg

Wheat 1.4 kg

Cassava 1.0 kg

Peas 0.9 kg

CHOOSING MORE SUSTAINABLE INGREDIENTS
Certain types of food place more strain on the environment due to their water or land requirements, carbon footprint, agricultural chemicals, biodiversity concerns, or other environmental pressures. While you probably don’t want to remove all of these foods from your menu, it’s good to understand their impacts and choose ingredients thoughtfully so you can avoid wasting limited resources.

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
Fruits and vegetables can vary widely in terms of environmental impact, so consider the tradeoffs when choosing ingredients. Produce grown far away also requires more transportation fuel and refrigeration to stay fresh during shipping, while locally grown produce can go from farm to fork with a lower environmental footprint, if produced by responsible suppliers.

FISH
Certain organizations, such as The Seafood Watch, publish lists to help businesses and consumers choose fish and seafood options with the least impact on marine life and the environment.12 Recommendations vary by location.

MEAT AND POULTRY
The carbon footprint of animal protein can vary widely, with beef and lamb contributing the most greenhouse gases. As you can see in the chart, the carbon footprint of animal protein can vary widely but beef and lamb contribute the most to greenhouse gases. That’s mainly because of methane production from cows and land conversion for grazing and animal feed.10,11

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moreGenerations of cooks have learned to squeeze every
FROM EVERY ounce of goodness from their ingredients. And many timehonored techniques are also effective ways to cut down
INGREDIENT on kitchen waste.

PREPARE TO PLEASE
Provide a range of portion sizes on the menu so guests can match their order to their appetite.
Cook dishes only on demand, or use past orders to forecast proper amounts.
Let guests choose their own sauces and side dishes so they won’t leave foods they dislike on the plate.
Train and mentor staff to avoid recipe and cooking mistakes and to follow serving size guidelines.

GETTING MORE FROM LESS

SPENT COOKING OIL: • Partner with a vendor who can equip
your kitchen to trap spent grease and cooking oil, schedule pickups, and haul it away to repurpose it as biofuel or a supplement for animal feed.
FRUITS, VEGETABLES & HERBS: • Use only edible garnishes.
• Add shredded trimmings and peels to stuffing, meatless burgers, or breads.
• Chop stems, cores, and extras for slaws or quick pickles.
• Use blemished pieces in salads or mashes.
• Tie onion skins and peelings into cheesecloth and cook in broth to add colour.
• Mash or mince them to flavour butter.
• Purée starches to create a thickener.
• Cook extra or overripe fruit in jam, sauces, pies, or cobblers.
• Extract juice from produce for smoothies, syrups and infusions.

ANIMAL PROTEIN AND CHEESE: • Cut up trim scraps for salad,
quiche, or soups.
• Boil poultry carcasses with leftover vegetables to make stock that you can freeze.
• Roast bones and cook with tomato paste, aromatics, and herbs to make fond de sauce.
• Add cheese scraps and rind to flavour broth with umami.
BEVERAGES: • Add sugar to extra coffee grounds
and use as a rub for meat.
• Use extra dairy products in chowder or pudding.
• Freeze juice or coffee for flavoured ice cubes that won’t water down drinks.

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Dilemma THE LEFTOVER
Despite your planning efforts, there’s usually extra food that you didn’t serve left at the end of the night. What can you do with it to reduce waste?

SAVE IT
• As long as the quality of the food won’t suffer and you have the storage space, you can always store it for future use.
• Be sure to label the storage container with the contents and date you prepared it.

GIVE IT AWAY
• After the shift, give remaining food away to employees.
• Give to charity, making arrangements with non-profits like local soup kitchens or food pantries so you can put your food to good use and build goodwill in your community at the same time. Keep records of these donations so you can claim them as tax deductions where allowed by law.
• Make arrangements with your nearby farms (including your suppliers) to use your scraps for animal feed.
• Partner with apps like Too Good To Go, that proposes to consumers to buy unused food at a discount.

MOVE IT
• Mark food down by 1/3 as you near closing time.
• To draw attention to this option (and potentially build your late-night traffic), advertise the savings on social media and provide coupons.

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COMPOSTING

Do-it-Yourself
If you have the space and time, turning scraps into compost can be very rewarding. You can find bins online, build your own, or even use a bucket.

Partner with a Provider
If you’re limited on space or have too many scraps, look for an industrial service that will provide bins and haul your compost away for processing. Follow these guidelines:

HERE’S THE BASIC APPROACH:
1. Pick a site, indoors or outdoors. 2. Create a bin. 3. Layer food waste, dry plant material like leaves or
sawdust, and soil. 4. Add water to keep the pile damp. 5. Stir the mixture to aerate. 6. Wait 2-3 months, continuing to aerate and keep the
mixture damp. 7. Use the completed compost in your garden and containers. If you produce enough compost, you can give some away to your produce suppliers and/or customers. Remember to promote your efforts to the public!

COMPOSTABLE
Put it in the bucket
• Fruit and vegetable scraps • Meat, bones, fish products • Pasta, bread, cereal • Cooked foods • Dairy products, egg shells • Coffee grounds • Pure paper items
(e.g. Flour and sugar bags) • Items labeled BPI Certified
Compostable

RECYCLE BIN OR TRASH
• Plastic (unless labeled compostable)
• Paper items • Styrofoam meat trays • Aluminum foil • Clam, oyster & mussel shells • Candles, synthetic corks & gum • Cigarette butts, tobacco • Disposable mop sheets • Recyclable materials • Items labeled
Oxo-Biodegradable

Check local sorting facilities and recycling rules on your country. If composting is not possible, give priority to recycling!

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AT THE
table Dinner is served, but waste reduction doesn’t end here. There are
several steps you can take to prevent or cut back on waste as you serve the meal and clean up after your guests.

Casual/Family Style/Fine Dining
• When guests choose smaller portions, use smaller plates to help them perceive a better value.
• Where the practice is acceptable, offer to wrap uneaten food so guests can finish it at home.
• Set up a collection point in the dish room where usable food scraps can be salvaged for composting. Train staff to separate food scraps from garbage to prevent contamination of compost.

Fast Casual/Takeout/Business & Institutions
• Replace single use plastic containers with reusable and recyclable options when possible.
• Where paper napkins are used, offer 1-2 per guest instead of unlimited access.
• Help guests dispose of items properly on-site by providing separate bins for composting, recycling, and trash along with pictures and simple instructions.
• Set up bins for recycling and try a deposit scheme to encourage returns of reusable to-go containers.

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Getting on the right
TRACK
No matter how much space, budget, or time you have to allocate to reducing waste, you can start to make changes today.

1 Measure how much waste your business produces in 1 week. For a big-picture look at your waste, place a scale under your trash and recycling bins and add up your total weight for the time period. You could also sort trash into basic categories like packaging, spoilage, food prep, and leftover food on plates to identify areas that need improvement.
2 Target the practices that led to the greatest waste, and look for ways to improve them, such as adjusting ordering or cooking quantities, retraining staff, sending more to composting/recycling, or tweaking menus.

3 Set some achievable goals to reduce your waste.
4 Measure categories again after a week or a month.
5 Track your progress.
6 Report your progress to customers to show you’re walking the talk.
7 Continue to set and work toward new goals and establish better practices.

Let’s all do our part, waste less and save resources for the future.

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Sources
1. United Nations Environment Programme, Food Waste Index Report 2021
2. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), Water and agriculture
3. World Economic Forum, How much plastic is there in the ocean?
4. Ellen Macarthur Foundation, The New Plastics Economy. 2016
5. ReFED, A Roadmap to Reduce U.S. Food Waste by 20 Percent. 2016
6. Datassential - Sustainability. 2021 7. World Resources Institute, The Business Case
for Reducing Food Loss and Waste 8. Nestlé Professional UK,
Balancing Plates Report. 2020 9. United States Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA), ENERGY STAR® Guide for Cafés, Restaurants, and Institutional Kitchens 10. Visual Capitalist, The Carbon Footprint of the Food Supply Chain 11. Poore, J., & Nemecek, T. (2018), Reducing food’s environmental impacts through producers and consumers 12. Seafood Watch, Consumer guides
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NestlÉ Professional Sustainability Magazine No Time To Waste