The ADP partners


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The ADP partners
The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) is the leading United Nations organization fighting to end the injustice of poverty, inequality, and climate change. Working with our broad network of experts and partners in 170 countries, we help nations to build integrated, lasting solutions for people and planet. Learn more at undp.org or follow at @UNDP
World Health Organization (WHO) is the directing and coordinating authority on international health within the United Nations (UN) system, working with 194 Member States in a shared commitment to achieve better health for everyone, everywhere. WHO supports countries as they coordinate the efforts of governments and partners to attain health objectives, supporting national health policies and strategies.
The Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) is a global programme of scientific collaboration that helps facilitate, support and influence efforts to combat diseases of poverty. It is hosted at the WHO, and is sponsored by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), UNDP, the World Bank and WHO.
PATH is an international non-governmental organization that drives transformative innovation to save lives and improve health, especially for women and children. PATH works to accelerate innovation across five platforms — vaccines, drugs, diagnostics, devices, and system and service innovations — that harness entrepreneurial insight, scientific and public health expertise, and passion for health equity. Working together with countries, PATH delivers measurable results that disrupt the cycle of poor health.
The collaboration between the Government of Japan and UNDP is a strategic partnership to promote research and development and to increase access to and delivery of health technologies used to address neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), tuberculosis (TB) and malaria.
Copyright © UNDP October 2021 All rights reserved Disclaimer: The views expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent those of the United Nations, including UNDP, or the UN Member States. Content and design by Inís Communication – www.iniscommunication.com

STATUS REPORT 2021

CONTENTS

2ACRONYMS AND
ABBREVIATIONS

4FOREWORD

6INTRODUCTION

10IMPACT AT THE COUNTRY,
REGIONAL AND GLOBAL LEVELS: A SNAPSHOT OF ADP RESULTS (APRIL 2020-MARCH 2021)

14SUPPORTING NATIONAL
RESPONSES TO THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC

17STRENGTHENING
NATIONAL HEALTH SYSTEMS: WORKING ACROSS THE VALUE CHAIN

24SOUTH–SOUTH AND
GLOBAL INITIATIVES

26 LOOKING AHEAD

ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS

ADP ADR aDSM
AEFI AMDF AMRH
AU AU Model Law
AUDA-NEPAD CARN-TB
CEMAC
COVID-19 ECOWAS
EUL eVIN
FDA GBT GHIT HITAP
HTA IDP IR IVDs LMICs

Access and Delivery Partnership
adverse drug reaction
active drug safety monitoring and management
adverse events following immunization
Africa Medical Devices Forum
African Medicines Regulatory Harmonization
African Union
AU Model Law on Medical Products Regulation
African Union Development Agency
Central African Regional Network for TB Control
Central African Economic and Monetary Community
coronavirus disease
Economic Community of West African States
WHO Emergency Use Listing
Electronic Vaccine Intelligence Network
Food and Drugs Authority
WHO Global Benchmarking Tool
Global Health Innovative Technology
Health Intervention Technology Assessment Programme
health technology assessment
institutional development plan
implementation research
in vitro diagnostics
low- and middle-income countries

MDA MDR-TB NHIF NRA NTDs PV RTS,S/AS01 SDG SMILE
SOPs SRA TB TDR
UHC UNDP
Uniting Efforts
USSD
WARN-TB
WHO

mass drug administration
multi-drug resistant tuberculosis
National Health Insurance Fund
National Regulatory Authority
neglected tropical diseases
pharmacovigilance
RTS,S
Sustainable Development Goal
Sistem Monitoring imunisasi Logistik secara Elektronik (Indonesia) standard operating procedures
stringent regulatory authorities
tuberculosis
Special Programme for Research and Training on Tropical Diseases
universal health coverage
United Nations Development Programme
Uniting Efforts for Innovation, Access and Delivery
unstructured supplementary service data
West African Regional Network for TB Control
World Health Organization

2

3

FOREWORD
The ongoing coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic is fueling a global health and development crisis of immense proportions. The combined health, social and economic consequences have reversed hard-won gains towards the Sustainable Development Goals. The commitment to “leave no one behind” is being tested by complex layers of inequalities, thrown into sharp relief by the pandemic.
The measures we take now to address the threat of COVID-19 – from tackling the current inequities in global vaccine access, to the existing fragility of national health systems, and the need to protect the vulnerable and marginalized groups within society – will have significant implications for the outlook for sustainable human development.
The ADP Status Report 2021 outlines how the Access and Delivery Partnership (ADP) has adapted its work in response to the pandemic. Since its inception, ADP has supported governments and stakeholders to strengthen national health systems. The ADP partner organizations work to strengthen institutional and human capacities within the ‘value chain’ of access and delivery – from policy, legal and regulatory frameworks, to research and regulatory capacities, to systems for procurement and supply chain management – to enable people’s access to health technologies.
Such a whole-of-government approach is now also recognized as essential to coordinated and effective COVID-19 responses. During the pandemic, ADP has sought to provide relevant and timely technical advice and information to bolster national COVID-19 responses. At the same time, ADP partners continue to maintain focus on existing health priorities, including tuberculosis, malaria and neglected tropical diseases. These endemic diseases impose health, social and economic burdens within poor and vulnerable populations, and previous gains must be safeguarded.
As you will see from this report, strengthening institutional and technical capacities within national health systems and supporting national responses to the COVID-19 pandemic are two sides of the same coin, each driving access to and delivery of affordable and quality-assured medicines, vaccines and diagnostics towards the achievement of universal health coverage. These investments in strengthening health systems will also have longer-term socioeconomic benefits, as well as laying the foundation for greater pandemic preparedness and human security in the future.
Dr. Mandeep Dhaliwal Director, HIV, Health and Development Group Bureau for Policy and Programme Support, UNDP
4

5

INTRODUCTION
The COVID-19 pandemic is an ongoing global health and development crisis that is reversing decades of progress on poverty, health and education, setting back important gains towards the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).
In what is widely regarded as the fastest breakthrough in the development of health technologies, there are now multiple safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines in use. But their availability signals just the start of the long journey towards ending the COVID-19 pandemic. Ensuring sufficient supplies of vaccines – and their equitable access around the world – are proving to be persistent global challenges. As of June 2021, three billion doses of COVID-19 vaccines have been administered but less than 1 percent of people in low-income countries have received a dose. As the vaccines become increasingly available in all countries, it is vital that national vaccination programmes are prepared and able to deliver vaccines to their populations as swiftly and as equitably as possible. In many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), however, pre-existing health system fragility and capacity gaps are significant bottlenecks to efficient vaccine delivery. Where they are weak, systems for vaccine distribution, tracking, delivery and administration must be strengthened; where they are lacking, they must be urgently developed.
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The ADP partners