The Wild Animal Park (Jeffrey Taylor)


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The Wild Animal Park (Jeffrey Taylor)
7621 Lakeport Rd., Chittenango, NY 13037
The Wild Animal Park, also known as The Wild Animal Experience, is owned by Jeffrey Taylor, who has failed to meet minimum standards for the care of animals used in exhibitions as established in the federal Animal Welfare Act (AWA). The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has cited him for failing to provide adequate veterinary care, failing to have an environmental enhancement plan for primates, failing to provide sufficient shelter from the elements, failing to provide adequate shade, failing to provide veterinarianapproved diets, failing to store food in a manner to protect it from contamination, failing to clean enclosures properly, and failing to provide secure enclosures.
January 30, 2020: The USDA cited Taylor for failing to provide primates with a regular diurnal light cycle. Animal care staff were turning the lights on and off daily at varying times. The squirrel monkeys had hair loss on their tails, “which could be due to the irregular light cycle if lights are turned on and off at different times each day.” Taylor was also cited for failing to provide adequate ventilation in a building housing two juvenile exotic animals. The building didn’t have electricity, and there was a large amount of condensation in the building.
June 8, 2016: The USDA cited Taylor for failing to supply adequate veterinary care to a zebra who had overgrown back hooves and for failing to provide environment enhancement to promote psychological

well-being for three juvenile olive baboons. Their enclosure had no platforms, climbing areas, or areas to allow the animals to hide from the public.
Taylor was also cited for failing to supply sufficient shelter for 13 deer, with additional fawns due at any time. The enclosure contained only one shelter and was in need of an additional one to allow all animals to fit comfortably during inclement weather. There were also no areas for the deer to “feel hidden from guests to give birth and then hide the fawns for safety.”
August 6, 2014: The USDA issued Taylor repeat citations for failing to have enough employees around the specific enclosures where members of the public were able to feed animals and for failing to provide animals with nutrition approved by the attending veterinarian. The deer, giraffe, eland, camel, zebra, and kangaroo were being fed a diet intended for cattle, horses, sheep, and goats, while the carnivores were fed primarily beef and a vitamin supplement with no written directions to ensure that the animals were receiving an adequate amount.
Taylor was also cited for housing a grivet and a vervet monkey in a room in which food, boxes of supplies for the park, fans, and drinks for the employees were stored. In addition, he failed to maintain the refrigerator, which was dirty, and uncovered meat for carnivores was stored on shelves above the fruit and vegetables intended for hoofstock and primates. Fluid from the meat was draining to the bottom of the refrigerator, potentially contaminating the produce. The food preparation area was also dirty. There was an abundance of flies, apparently attracted to the empty Pepsi cans that had been improperly discarded in the sink area.

July 27, 2013: The USDA cited Taylor for failing to have enough employees around the specific enclosures where members of the public were able to feed animals, failing to provide sufficient shade outside the shelters, and failing to have climbing or perching structures in the bobcat enclosure to allow the cat to get off the ground. “The natural movement for a bobcat is climbing trees and other structures, this animal should be provided the opportunity to get off the ground to make species appropriate movements.” Taylor was also cited for having the Watusi’s mineral block placed on the ground, risking contamination, and for failing to keep the zebra enclosure free from an accumulation of feces. The enclosure was only cleaned once a month.
June 5, 2013: The USDA cited Taylor for failing to have a responsible adult available to accompany inspectors during the inspection process and for failing to have a facility constructed to contain animals. While the inspector waited, she saw several pygmy goats pass between the bars of the main gate and wander through the parking lot.
December 17, 2012: The USDA cited Taylor for failing to have a veterinarianapproved written plan of environmental enhancement to promote psychological well-being for a recently acquired infant primate that “includes special considerations because [the animal] is an infant and isolated from other non human primates.” He was also cited for having building supplies and insulation around the area that hay was being stored in, risking contamination.
May 31, 2012: The USDA cited Taylor for failing to have a primary enclosure for a 5week-old tiger cub. The cub was kept in the house, confined to the kitchen. Taylor was also cited for failing to have a veterinarianapproved written diet plan for the cub.

The Wild Animal Park

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The Wild Animal Park (Jeffrey Taylor)