National Building Code Of India 2005 Group 3


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Disclosure to Promote the Right To Information
Whereas the Parliament of India has set out to provide a practical regime of right to information for citizens to secure access to information under the control of public authorities, in order to promote transparency and accountability in the working of every public authority, and whereas the attached publication of the Bureau of Indian Standards is of particular interest to the public, particularly disadvantaged communities and those engaged in the pursuit of education and knowledge, the attached public safety standard is made available to promote the timely dissemination of this information in an accurate manner to the public.

“जान1 का अ+धकार, जी1 का अ+धकार”
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SP 7 : Group 3 (2005): NATIONAL BUILDING CODE OF INDIA 2005 GROUP 3 [CED 46: National Building Code]

“!ान $ एक न' भारत का +नम-ण”
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“!ान एक ऐसा खजाना > जो कभी च0राया नहB जा सकता है”
Bhartṛhari—Nītiśatakam “Knowledge is such a treasure which cannot be stolen”

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NATIONAL BUILDING CODE OF INDIA 2005 Group 3

NATIONAL BUILDING CODE OF INDIA
2005

GROUP 3 PART 0
PART 7

INTEGRATED APPROACH — PREREQUISITE FOR APPLYING PROVISIONS OF THE CODE
CONSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICES AND SAFETY

BUREAU OF INDIAN STANDARDS

SP 7 (Group 3) : 2005
FIRST PUBLISHED 1970 FIRST REVISION 1983 SECOND REVISION 2005 © BUREAU OF INDIAN STANDARDS ICS 0.120; 91.040.01 ISBN 81-7061-026-5
PRICE Rs. 1080.00
PUBLISHED BY BUREAU OF INDIAN STANDARDS, MANAK BHAVAN, 9 BAHADUR SHAH ZAFAR MARG, NEW DELHI 110 002, PRINTED AT SUNSHINE PROCESS, C-105/5, NARAINA INDUSTRIAL AREA, PHASE I, NEW DELHI 110 028 (INDIA). BIS Website: www.bis.org.in
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FOREWORD
Construction programmes are interwoven in a large measure in all sectors of development, be it housing, transport, industry, irrigation, power, agriculture, education or health. Construction, both public and private, accounts for about fifty percent of the total outlay in any Five Year Plan. Half of the total money spent on construction activities is spent on buildings for residential, industrial, commercial, administrative, education, medical, municipal and entertainment uses. It is estimated that about half of the total outlay on buildings would be on housing. It is imperative that for such a large national investment, optimum returns are assured and wastage in construction is avoided.
Soon after the Third Plan, the Planning Commission decided that the whole gamut of operations involved in construction, such as, administrative, organizational, financial and technical aspects, be studied in depth. For this study, a Panel of Experts was appointed in 1965 by the Planning Commission and its recommendations are found in the ‘Report on Economies in Construction Costs’ published in 1968.
One of the facets of building construction, namely, controlling and regulating buildings through municipal byelaws and departmental handbooks received the attention of the Panel and a study of these regulatory practices revealed that some of the prevailing methods of construction were outmoded; some designs were overburdened with safety factors and there were other design criteria which, in the light of newer techniques and methodologies, could be rationalized; and building byelaws and regulations of municipal bodies which largely regulate the building activity in the country wherever they exist, were outdated. They did not cater to the use of new building materials and the latest developments in building designs and construction techniques. It also became clear that these codes and byelaws lacked uniformity and they were more often than not ‘specification oriented’ and not ‘performance oriented’.
These studies resulted in a recommendation that a National Building Code be prepared to unify the building regulations throughout the country for use by government departments, municipal bodies and other construction agencies. The then Indian Standards Institution (now Bureau of Indian Standards) was entrusted by the Planning Commission with the preparation of the National Building Code. For fulfilling this task a Guiding Committee for the preparation of the Code was set up by the Civil Engineering Division Council of the Indian Standards Institution in 1967. This Committee, in turn, set up 18 specialist panels to prepare the various parts of the Code. The Guiding Committee and its panels were constituted with architects, planners, materials experts, structural, construction, electrical illumination, air conditioning, acoustics and public health engineers and town planners. These experts were drawn from the Central and State Governments, local bodies, professional institutions and private agencies. The first version of the Code was published in 1970.
After the National Building Code of India was published in 1970, a vigorous implementation drive was launched by the Indian Standards Institution to propagate the contents and use of the Code among all concerned in the field of planning, designing and construction activities. For this, State-wise Implementation Conferences were organized with the participation of the leading engineers, architects, town planners, administrators, building material manufacturers, building and plumbing services installation agencies, contractors, etc.
These Conferences were useful in getting across the contents of the Code to the interests concerned. These Conferences had also helped in the establishment of Action Committees to look into the actual implementation work carried out by the construction departments, local bodies and other agencies in different States. The main actions taken by the Action Committees were to revise and modernize their existing regulatory media, such as, specifications, handbooks, manuals, etc, as well as building byelaws of local bodies like municipalities at city and town levels, zilla parishads, panchayats and development authorities, so as to bring them in line with the provisions contained in the National Building Code of India. In this process, the Indian Standards Institution rendered considerable support in redrafting process.
Since the publication in 1970 version of the National Building Code of India, a large number of comments and useful suggestions for modifications and additions to different parts and sections of the Code were received as a result of use of the Code by all concerned, and revision work of building byelaws of some States. Based on the comments and suggestion received the National Building Code of India 1970 was revised in 1983.
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Some of the important changes in 1983 version included : addition of development control rules, requirements for greenbelts and landscaping including norms for plantation of shrubs and trees, special requirements for low income housing; fire safety regulations for high rise buildings; revision of structural design section based on new and revised codes, such as Concrete Codes (plain and reinforced concrete and prestressed concrete), Earthquake Code, Masonry Code; addition of outside design conditions for important cities in the country, requirements relating to noise and vibration, air filter, automatic control, energy conservation for air conditioning; and guidance on the design of water supply system for multi-storeyed buildings.
The National Building Code of India is a single document in which, like a network, the information contained in various Indian Standards is woven into a pattern of continuity and cogency with the interdependent requirements of Sections carefully analyzed and fitted in to make the whole document a cogent continuous volume. A continuous thread of ‘preplanning’ is woven which, in itself, contributes considerably to the economies in construction particularly in building and plumbing services.
The Code contains regulations which can be immediately adopted or enacted for use by various departments, municipal administrations and public bodies. It lays down a set of minimum provisions designed to protect the safety of the public with regard to structural sufficiency, fire hazards and health aspects of buildings; so long as these basic requirements are met, the choice of materials and methods of design and construction is left to the ingenuity of the building professionals. The Code also covers aspects of administrative regulations, development control rules and general building requirements; fire protection requirements; stipulations regarding materials and structural design; rules for design of electrical installations, lighting, air conditioning and lifts; regulation for ventilation, acoustics and plumbing services, such as, water supply, drainage, sanitation and gas supply; measures to ensure safety of workers and public during construction; and rules for erection of signs and outdoor display structures.
Some other important points covered by the Code include ‘industrialized systems of building’ and ‘architectural control’. The increase in population in the years to come will have a serious impact on the housing problem. It has been estimated that the urban population of India will continue to increase with such pace as to maintain the pressure on demand of accommodation for them. Speed of construction is thus of an utmost importance and special consideration has to be given to industrialized systems of building. With increased building activity, it is also essential that there should be some architectural control in the development of our cities and towns if creation of ugliness and slum-like conditions in our urban areas is to be avoided.
Since the publication of 1983 version of National Building Code of India, the construction industry has gone through major technological advancement. In the last two decades, substantial expertise has been gained in the areas of building planning, designing and construction. Also, lot of developments have taken places in the technolegal regime and techno-financial regime, apart from the enormous experience gained in dealing with natural calamities like super cyclones and earthquakes faced by the country. Further, since the last revision in 1983 based on the changes effected in the Steel Code, Masonry Code and Loading Code as also in order to update the fire protection requirements, three amendments were brought out to the 1983 version of the Code. Considering these, it was decided to take up a comprehensive revision of the National Building Code of India.
The changes incorporated in the present Code, which is second revision of the Code, have been specified in the Foreword to each Part/Section of the Code. Some of the important changes are:
a) A new Part 0 ‘Integrated Approach — Prerequisite for Applying the Provisions of the Code’ emphasizing on multi-disciplinary team approach for successfully accomplishing building/development project, has been incorporated.
b) New chapters on significant areas like structural design using bamboo, mixed/composite construction and landscaping have been added.
c) Number of provisions relating to reform in administration of the Code as also assigning duties and responsibilities to all concerned professionals, have been incorporated/modified. Also detailed provisions/ performance to ensure structural sufficiency of buildings, have been prescribed so as to facilitate implementation of the related requirements to help safely face the challenges during natural disasters like earthquake.
d) Planning norms and requirements for hilly areas and rural habitat planning, apart from detailed planning norms for large number of amenities have been incorporated.
e) Fire safety aspects have been distinctly categorized into fire prevention, life safety and fire protection
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giving detailed treatment to each based on current international developments and latest practices followed in the country. f) Aspects like energy conservation and sustainable development have been consistently dealt with in various parts and sections through appropriate design, usage and practices with regard to building materials, construction technologies and building and plumbing services. Renewable resources like bamboo and practices like rain water harvesting have been given their due place. g) The latest revised earthquake code, IS 1893 (Part 1) : 2002 ‘Criteria for earthquake resistant design of structures: Part 1 General provisions and buildings’, has been incorporated, due implementation of the provisions of which in applicable seismic zone of the country, needs to be duly adhered to by the Authorities. The Code now published is the third version representing the present state of knowledge on various aspects of building construction. The process of preparation of the 2005 version of the Code had thrown up a number of problems; some of them were answered fully and some partially. Therefore, a continuous programme will go on by which additional knowledge that is gained through technological evolution, users’ views over a period of time pinpointing areas of clarification and coverage and results of research in the field, would be incorporated in to the Code from time to time to make it a living document. It is, therefore, proposed to bring out changes to the Code periodically. The provisions of this Code are intended to serve as a model for adoption by Public Works Departments and other government construction departments, local bodies and other construction agencies. Existing PWD codes, municipal byelaws and other regulatory media could either be replaced by the National Building Code of India or suitably modified to cater to local requirements in accordance with the provisions of the Code. Any difficulties encountered in adoption of the Code could be brought to the notice of the Sectional Committee for corrective action.
This publication forms part of the National Building Code of India 2005 and contains the following Parts:
PART 0 INTEGRATED APPROACH — PREREQUISITE FOR APPLYING PROVISIONS OF THE CODE
PART 7 CONSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICES AND SAFETY The provisions contained in this publication which would guide the concerned professionals in the field to execute the various constructional operations in a safe and efficient manner.
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National Building Code Sectional Committee, CED 46

Chairman Dr H. C. VISVESVARAYA ‘Chandrika’, at 15th Cross, 63-64 East Park Road Malleswaram, Bangalore 560 003

Vice-Chairman SHRI V. SURESH P-233/3, Officers Enclave, Air Force Station, Rajokari, New Delhi 110 038

Organization Ahmedabad Municipal Corporation, Ahmedabad
Bangalore Mahanagara Palike, Bangalore
Builders Association of India, Mumbai Building Materials and Technology Promotion Council, New Delhi Bureau of Energy Efficiency (Ministry of Power), New Delhi Central Building Research Institute (CSIR), Roorkee
Central Public Health and Environmental Engineering Organisation (Ministry of Urban Development and Poverty Alleviation), New Delhi
Central Public Works Department (Central Designs Organization), New Delhi
Central Public Works Department (Electrical Department), New Delhi
Centre for Disaster Mitigation and Management, Anna University, Chennai
Chennai Metropolitan Development Authority, Chennai
Construction Industry Development Council, New Delhi
Council of Architecture, New Delhi
Delhi Development Authority, New Delhi
Delhi Fire Service, Government of National Capital Territory of Delhi, Delhi
Department of Science and Technology (Ministry of Science and Technology), New Delhi
Directorate General of Employment and Training, New Delhi Engineer-in-Chief’s Branch, Army Headquarters, New Delhi
Forest Research Institute (Indian Council for Forestry Research and Education), Dehra Dun
Housing and Urban Development Corporation Ltd, New Delhi
Indian Geotechnical Society, New Delhi

Representative(s) SHRI VATSAL S. PATEL
SHRI JAGDISH A. PATEL (Alternate) SHRI M. R. SREENIVASA MURTHY
SHRI R. RAMEGOWDA (Alternate I) SHRI N. KRISHNA (Alternate II) SHRI B. G. AHUJA SHRI T. N. GUPTA & SHRI D. B. N. RAO REPRESENTATIVE SHRI V. K. MATHUR SHRI B. S. GUPTA (Alternate) SHRI B. B. UPPAL SHRI V. K. CHAURASIA (Alternate)
CHIEF ENGINEER (DESIGNS) SUPERINTENDING ENGINEER (S & S) (Alternate)
CHIEF ENGINEER (ELECTRICAL) I
DIRECTOR
MEMBER SECRETARY SHRI N. V. RAKHUNATH (Alternate)
SHRI P. R. SWARUP SHRI ANIL CHADHA (Alternate)
SHRI PREMENDRA RAJ MEHTA SHRI SUDHIR VOHRA (Alternate)
ENGINEER MEMBER CHIEF ENGINEER (HQ) (Alternate)
SHRI R. C. SHARMA
SHRI V. RAO ALYAGARI
SHRI ASHWANI KUMAR BRIG S. K. SHARMA
SHRI D. K. DINKER (Alternate) DIRECTOR GENERAL
DIRECTOR (Alternate) CHAIRMAN & MANAGING DIRECTOR
SHRI R. K. SAFAYA (Alternate) SHRI D. B. MAHAJAN
DR M. D. DESAI (Alternate)

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National Building Code Of India 2005 Group 3