2018 Forestry and Wildlife Research Review


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2018 Forestry and Wildlife Research Review
Thursday January 11, 2018 Cloquet Forestry Center Cloquet, MN

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Table of Contents
Agenda ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 5 Welcome and Overview ........................................................................................................................................................ 7
Block 1......................................................................................................................................................................................... 8 Climate-driven changes in future Minnesota mammal species ...................................................................... 8
Emerald Ash Borer and Black Ash: Wildlife Impacts................................................................................. 9 Enhancing the U.S. Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis database for supporting wildlife assessment: Implementation of U.S. National Vegetation Classification...................................................10
Impact of Latent (hidden) Diplodia Infections on Planted Red Pine Seedlings............................11 Effects of Alternative Silvicultural Methods on Black Spruce Tree and Stand Dynamics ..................12
LiDAR Derived Topographic Riparian Areas Utilizing LiDAR Digital Elevation Models to Produce Variable Width Riparian Areas................................................................................................................. 13
First-Year Effects of Biochar and Weed Control on Jack Pine (Pinus banksiana) Survival and Growth .................................................................................................................................................................................. 14
Block 2....................................................................................................................................................................................... 15 Coastal Adaptations: Forests and Freshwater .....................................................................................................15
Assessing quaking aspen stress and mortality along a climate gradient in Northern Minnesota ............................................................................................................................................................................ 16 Inventory of Northern White-Cedar Regeneration and Factors Affecting Seedling Establishment and Growth .........................................................................................................................................................................17
Temperature and water level effects on greenhouse gas fluxes from black ash wetland soils .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 18 Examining the effects of timber management on water quantity and water quality in the Upper Midwest................................................................................................................................................................................ 20
Forest loss in Minnesota since European settlement..............................................................................21 3

Block 3.......................................................................................................................................................................................22 Ten Years Post-Harvest: Results from the Wisconsin Northern Hardwoods Managed Silviculture Study ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 22
Forest management for multiple objectives: adaptation, timber production, and wildlife silviculture case studies at the Cloquet Forestry Center .................................................................................23 Lake States Maple Syrup Producers and Their Attitudes Towards and Responses to Economic, Social, Ecological, and Climate Challenges.............................................................................................................24
Seedling Response to Adaptive Silviculture Treatments Aimed at Climate Change in Northern Minnesota........................................................................................................................................................ 26 A 2016 Profile of Minnesota Logging Business Owners...................................................................................27
Minnesota Breeding Bird Atlas.........................................................................................................................29
Block 4....................................................................................................................................................................................... 30 Does Wildland Fire Cause Increases in Mercury in Fish?................................................................................30 A foundational data set characterizing historic forest attributes and disturbance patterns ...........31 Urban Tree Canopy Mapping and Measuring using High-Resolution Remotely Sensed Data .........33
Poster only.............................................................................................................................................................................. 35 Methylmercury Accumulation in Wildlife in an Upland Forest-Peatland Habitat ................................35 Mapping of Black Ash Forest Threatened By Emerald Ash Borer In Northern Minnesota, USA.....36 Individual detection and plot-wide estimation of coarse woody debris density and volume using airborne LiDAR..................................................................................................................................................................37
Acknowledgements .............................................................................................................................................................. 38 SFEC Member Organizations for 2017-2018 ............................................................................................................. 39 Keep in touch with SFEC..................................................................................................................................................... 40
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Agenda

8:15am 8:45am 8:50am
10:20am 10:50am

Check-in opens Welcome and agenda review
Ag Block 1 V e Climate-driven changes in future Minnesota mammal ie nd species h w a Emerald Ash Borer and Black Ash: Wildlife Impacts ttp up ha Enhancing the U.S. Forest Service Forest Inventory and :/ d s Analysis database for supporting wildlife assessment /z. ate be Impact of Latent (hidden) Diplodia Infections on Planted u d e Red Pine Seedlings mn ag n u Effects of Alternative Silvicultural Methods on Black .e e p Spruce Tree and Stand Dynamics du nd dat LiDAR Derived Topographic Riparian Areas /R a f ed First-Year Effects of Biochar and Weed Control on Jack R il . Pine (Pinus banksiana) Survival and Growth 18 e at Break and poster session

Eli Sagor, UMN-SFEC Blosdk Ron Moen, UMN-Duluth Alexis Grinde, NRRI Mark Nelson, USFS-NRS
Brian Schwingle, MN DNR
Brian Anderson, UMN-FR
Jennifer Corcoran, DNRRA Sara Kelso, UMN-FR

Block 2

Coastal Adaptations: Forests and Freshwater

Meredith Cornett, TNC

Assessing Quaking Aspen Stress and Mortality Along a Climate Gradient in Northern Minnesota

Ryan Ness, BSU

Inventory of Northern White-Cedar Regeneration and Factors Affecting Seedling Establishment and Growth

Laura Reuling, WI DNR

Temperature and Water Level Effects on Greenhouse Gas Alan Toczydlowski, UMN-

Fluxes from Black Ash Wetland Soils

FR

Examining the effects of timber management on water quantity and water quality in the Upper Midwest

Lucy Rose, UMN-FR

Forest Loss in Minnesota Since European Settlement 12:00pm Lunch and poster session

Peter Jacobson, DNRFisheries

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1:00pm 1:55

Block 3 Ten Years Post-Harvest: Results from the Wisconsin Northern Hardwoods Managed Silviculture Study

Recent and ongoing silviculture research at the Cloquet Forestry Center

Lake States Maple Syrup Producers and Their Attitudes Towards and Responses to Economic, Social, Ecological, and Climate Challenges

Seedling Response to Adaptive Silviculture Treatments Aimed at Climate Change in Northern Minnesota

A 2016 Profile of Minnesota Logging Business Owners

Minnesota Breeding Bird Atlas

2:20pm 2:50pm

Break and poster session
Block 4 Does Wildland Fire Cause Increases in Mercury in Fish?

A foundational data set characterizing historic forest attributes and disturbance patterns
Urban Tree Canopy Mapping and Measuring using HighResolution Remotely Sensed Data
4:00pm Closing and adjourn

Dustin Bronson, WI DNR Kyle Gill, UMN-CFC Stephanie Snyder, USFS
Jacob Muller, UMN-FR
Charlie Blinn, UMN-FR Nicholas Walton, UMD-
NRRI
Trent Wickman, USFSEastern Region, Duluth Jody Vogeler, UMN-FR Trevor Host, UMN-FR

Denotes a Lightning Talk
Poster-only presentations not listed above: Methylmercury Accumulation in Wildlife in an Upland Forest-Peatland Habitat. Susan Eggert, USDA-NRS
Mapping of Black Ash Forest Threatened By Emerald Ash Borer In Northern Minnesota, USA. Peder Engelstad, CSU
Individual detection and plot-wide estimation of coarse woody debris density and volume using airborne LiDAR, Michael Joyce, UMD-NRRI

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Welcome and Overview
Welcome to SFEC’s 2018 Forestry and Wildlife Research Review! The Research Review is one of our most important events. Each year it brings together a large and diverse group of natural resource professionals for updates on research relevant to their work. The presentations, questions, and discussion from wildlife managers, foresters, ecologists, water resource specialists, outreach professionals, students, and others bring us all up to speed on new developments and how they can inform our work on the ground. While there is not much time for Q&A during the presentation sessions, we have designed the event with conversation in mind. The generous breaks and Stine Room layout are intended to create opportunities to ask questions of presenters and peers, challenge what you’ve heard, and explore ways to improve the resource conservation and management work that you do every day. We hope you’ll consider the presentations the start of a conversation, not the last word. As usual, this year’s Review includes a large group of presenters. You will hear 20-minute presentations and 5-minute lightning talks throughout the day. The lightning talks are a brief way to get the big ideas across so that you can fill in the details during the breaks and poster sessions. We’re glad you joined us and we hope you enjoy the day! -Eli Sagor and Madison Rodman
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Block 1
Ron Moen University of Minnesota Duluth [email protected], 218-788-2610 Climate-driven changes in future Minnesota mammal species Climate change is projected to increase mean annual temperature and precipitation in the Midwest. This will affect the distribution and abundance of mammal species in Minnesota. We used past trends in population size, climate envelope modelling, and recent observations to predict species responses to climate change in Minnesota. Because Minnesota is on the southern edge of the boreal forest and at the transition of prairie, northern hardwoods, and boreal forest, we will probably see more changes in mammal species than other areas. About half of current mammal species should still be present 50 years in the future. Example species include the short-tailed shrew, woodchuck, deer mouse, beaver, and white-tailed deer. About 20% of species will probably no longer be present, including Canada lynx, moose, American marten, and northern flying squirrel. About 20% of species should show a larger change in distribution within Minnesota; example species include the opossum, gray squirrel, skunk, and bobcat. Among the caveats to these predictions are that dispersal rates of smaller mammals could be limiting and that the magnitude of future climate change is unknown. Over the last 200 years we have already seen changes in the distributions and abundances of the other 10% of mammal species in Minnesota, and we are entering a future without a historical analog with respect to rate of climate change. Additional author names and affiliations: Steve K. Windels, Voyageurs National Park
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Alexis Grinde Natural Resources Research Institute University of Minnesota Duluth [email protected], 218-788-2747
Emerald Ash Borer and Black Ash: Wildlife Impacts Emerald ash borers (Agrilus planipennis; EAB) cause near 100% mortality of ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees. Where they are the dominant species, loss of black ash (F. nigra) could result in black ash wetlands becoming emergent wetlands dominated by sedge. Our study uses a combination of experimental and control sites throughout northern Minnesota’s black ash forests to examine the impacts of EAB on bird, mammal, and herptile diversity. The goals of our project are to: 1.)Assess wildlife species that utilize black ash wetlands compared to non-ash wetlands and upland forests; 2.) Determine how loss of ash will alter wildlife communities; and 3.) Identify vulnerable wildlife species and develop recommendations and strategies to maintain biodiversity. The project completed the first year of wildlife sampling and preliminary results will be discussed. Additional author names and affiliations: Josh Bednar, Natural Resources Research Institute, University of Minnesota Duluth; Nick Walton, Natural Resources Research Institute, University of Minnesota Duluth; Robert Slesak, Minnesota Forest Resource Council; Melissa B. Youngquist, University of Minnesota; Anthony D’Amato, University of Vermont; Brian Palik, USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station; Gerald Niemi, Natural Resources Research Institute, University of Minnesota Duluth
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Mark Nelson U.S. Forest Service, Northern Research Station [email protected], 651-649-5104
Enhancing the U.S. Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis database for supporting wildlife assessment: Implementation of U.S. National Vegetation Classification The U.S. Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program maintains information on the status and trends of the nation’s forests. FIA data and information have been used for conducting numerous wildlife habitat assessments, but there is no nationally consistent approach for linking FIA with wildlife species-habitat relationships. The U.S. National Vegetation Classification (NVC) Standard was adopted by the Federal Geographic Data Committee as a federal standard for reporting vegetation information across the United States (FGDC 2008). NatureServe and the U.S. Forest Service are collaborating to implement the NVC in the FIA Program. NVC uses an ecological vegetation approach that integrates ecological factors with all vegetation layers into an 8-level hierarchy of types. The mid-level types are practical for classifying the nation’s forests using tree data collected on FIA “Phase 2” (P2) plots. For eastern U.S. forests, including Minnesota, NatureServe scientists completed a narrative-based key that uses available FIA attributes and tree species and life-history data to assign FIA P2 plot conditions to 27 macrogroup types and 11 plantation types. FIA analysts developed a computer algorithm based on this key, allowing for automated classification of each forested FIA condition. This key allows FIA to report data on eastern U.S. forests (and eventually all U.S. forests) using the NVC standard. The new FIA-NVC attributes will facilitate collaborations with other agencies using the NVC, and provide a consistent relationship between FIA and various wildlife species-habitat relationship matrices that use NVC, like those produced by NatureServe and GAP.
Additional author names and affiliations: Shannon Menard, Don Faber-Langendoen, Kevin Nimerfro, Mark Nelson*, Mary Miller, James Garner (Nelson is corresponding author and presenter)
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2018 Forestry and Wildlife Research Review