Standard Functional Specifications for Law Enforcement


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Bureau of Justice Assistance
Office of Justice Programs  U.S. Department of Justice

NIJ

National Institute of Justice
The Research, Development, and Evaluation Agency of the U.S. Department of Justice

Standard Functional Specifications for
Law Enforcement Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) Systems

Developed by the
Law Enforcement Information Technology Standards Council (LEITSC)

Standard Functional Specifications for
Law Enforcement Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) Systems

Developed by the
Law Enforcement Information Technology Standards Council (LEITSC)

Standard Functional Specifications for Law Enforcement Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) Systems



This document was prepared with the guidance, leadership, and funding of the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice, in collaboration with the Law Enforcement Information Technology Standards Council. This project was supported by Grant No. 2003-MU-BX-0068, awarded by the Bureau of Justice Assistance.

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Standard Functional Specifications for Law Enforcement Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) Systems

Acknowledgements

LEITSC Governance
Larry Boyd, Chairman Chief of Police Irving (TX) Police Department Police Executive Research Forum (PERF)
Joe Akers LEITSC Staff Liaison National Organization of Black Law Enforcement
Executives (NOBLE)
Terry Chowanec LEITSC Staff Liaison PERF
Ted Kamatchus, Vice Chair Sheriff Marshall County (IA) Sheriff’s Office National Sheriffs’ Association (NSA)
Mark Marshall Chief of Police Smithfield (VA) Police Department International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP)
Morris Roberson U.S. Postal Service (Retired) NOBLE
Heather Ruzbasan LEITSC Project Manager
G. Matthew Snyder LEITSC Staff Liaison IACP
Fred Wilson LEITSC Staff Liaison NSA

LEITSC Functional Standards Committee
Joe Cassa Bureau Commander Wheat Ridge (CO) Police Department
Mitchell Ray Davis, III Chief of Police Dixmoor (IL) Police Department
Debbie Fox Information Technology Administrator Louisville (KY) Metro Police Department
Michael Haslip Chief of Police City of Blaine (WA) Police Department
Linda Hill Consultant IJIS Institute
J. B. Hopkins Division Commander/Jail Administrator Story County (IA) Sheriff’s Office
Dina Jones CAD Manager Story County (IA) Sheriff’s Office
Bruce Kelling Bask Enterprises, LLC Managing Principal
Daniel Murray IT Management Section Commander Arlington County (VA) Police Department

Standard Functional Specifications for Law Enforcement Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) Systems

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Beverly Muse Technology Manager City of Chattanooga (TN)
Morris Roberson Postal Inspector (Retired) U.S. Postal Service
Jim Slater Chief Information Officer Massachusetts Executive Office of Public Safety
Mark Steigemeier Vice President Motorola
Darrell True IT Administrator Wrentham (MA) Police Department
Gary Vest Chief of Police Powell (OH) Police Department
Paul Wormeli Executive Director IJIS Institute
Advisors and Other Program Contacts
William Cade, Jr. Director, 911 Services and Communications Operations
Center Association of Public Safety Communications Officials
Joe Estey Chief of Police Hartford (VT) Police Department Former LEITSC Governance Member IACP
Joe Heaps Communications Technology Portfolio Manager National Institute of Justice Office of Justice Programs U.S. Department of Justice
Dustin Koonce Policy Advisor Bureau of Justice Assistance Office of Justice Programs U.S. Department of Justice

J. Patrick McCreary Associate Deputy Director Bureau of Justice Assistance Office of Justice Programs U.S. Department of Justice
Harlin McEwen Chief of Police (Retired) Ithaca (NY) Police Department
David Mulholland Lieutenant U.S. Park Police IACP
Jennifer Zeunik Former LEITSC Project Manager (2002–2005) IACP
Project Manager
Heather Ruzbasan LEITSC International Association of Chiefs of Police 515 North Washington Street Alexandria, VA 22314 (703) 836-6767, ext. 275 [email protected] www.leitsc.org
Special Thanks to Our Partners
IJwIwSwI.nijisst.oitrugte
This document is the result of an extraordinary collaboration between many justice practitioners and industry experts. Thank you all for your commitment, time, energy, and patience.

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Standard Functional Specifications for Law Enforcement Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) Systems

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements............................................................................................................................................................ iii
Table of Contents................................................................................................................................................................. v
Executive Summary: CAD................................................................................................................................................ vii
Business Function: Law Enforcement Dispatch.............................................................................................................. 1 1.1 Description: ..................................................................................................................................................................... 1 1.2 Use Case Diagram........................................................................................................................................................... 1 1.3 Use Case Specification: Call Taking............................................................................................................................... 1 1.4 Use Case Specification: Dispatch Decision Support....................................................................................................... 6 1.5 Use Case Specification: BOLO....................................................................................................................................... 7 1.6 Use Case Specification: Dispatch Units.......................................................................................................................... 7 1.7 Use Case Specification: Unit Status Management....................................................................................................... 10 1.8 Use Case Specification: Call Management................................................................................................................... 12 1.9 Use Case Specification: Supplemental Resources Tracking........................................................................................ 14 1.10 Use Case Specification: Call Disposition.................................................................................................................... 15
Business Function: CAD System Administration.......................................................................................................... 17 2.1 Description: ................................................................................................................................................................... 17 2.2 Use Case Diagram......................................................................................................................................................... 17 2.3 Use Case Specification: Geofile Maintenance.............................................................................................................. 17 2.4 Use Case Specification: Security.................................................................................................................................. 17 2.5 Use Case Specification: Logging.................................................................................................................................. 18 2.6 Use Case Specification: Configuration.......................................................................................................................... 18 2.7 Use Case Specification: Table Maintenance................................................................................................................. 19 2.8 Use Case Specification: Communication Center Relocation........................................................................................ 19 2.9 Use Case Specification: CAD Catch-Up....................................................................................................................... 19
Business Function: Support Services............................................................................................................................ 21 3.1 Description: ................................................................................................................................................................... 21 3.2 Use Case Diagram......................................................................................................................................................... 21 3.3 Use Case Specification: BOLO..................................................................................................................................... 21 3.4 Use Case Specification: Emergency Operations Center.............................................................................................. 22
Business Function: Call Management and Management Reporting............................................................................ 23 4.1 Description: ................................................................................................................................................................... 23 4.2 Use Case Diagram......................................................................................................................................................... 23 4.3 Use Case Specification: Dispatch Supervisor Support................................................................................................. 23 4.4 Use Case Specification: CAD Management Reporting................................................................................................. 23 4.5 Use Case Specification: Training and Testing............................................................................................................... 24

Standard Functional Specifications for Law Enforcement Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) Systems



Business Function: Interfaces......................................................................................................................................... 25 5.1 Description: ................................................................................................................................................................... 25 5.2 Use Case Diagram......................................................................................................................................................... 25 5.3 Use Case Specification: Primary................................................................................................................................... 25 5.4 Use Case Specification: Additional Interfaces............................................................................................................... 25 5.5 Use Case Specification: Locational Systems Interfaces............................................................................................... 27 5.6 Use Case Specification: Administration Interfaces........................................................................................................ 27 5.7 Use Case Specification: Communications Interfaces................................................................................................... 28 5.8 Use Case Specification: Public Awareness Messaging................................................................................................ 28 5.9 Use Case Specification: Emergency Operations Interface........................................................................................... 28 5.10 Additional Business Functions..................................................................................................................................... 29
Conclusion.......................................................................................................................................................................... 31
Properties: Activity......................................................................................................................................................... A:1
Properties: Actor............................................................................................................................................................. A:7
Properties: Business Function.....................................................................................................................................A:11
Properties: State........................................................................................................................................................... A:13
Properties: Use Case.................................................................................................................................................... A:15

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Standard Functional Specifications for Law Enforcement Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) Systems

Executive Summary: CAD

History
The Law Enforcement Information Technology Standards Council (LEITSC) was created in 2002 with funding (Grant Number 2002-LD-BX-0002) from the U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Assistance and continued in 2003 with funding (Grant Number 2003-MU-BX-0068) through a collaborative effort between the Bureau of Justice Assistance and the National Institute of Justice. LEITSC is currently funded under the Bureau of Justice Assistance (Grant Number 2003-MU-BX-0068) and continues to work in cooperation with the National Institute of Justice. LEITSC brings together representatives from the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), National Sheriffs’ Association (NSA), National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives (NOBLE), and Police Executive Research Forum (PERF) to address law enforcement information technology standards issues. The mission of the group is to foster the growth of strategic planning and implementation of integrated justice systems through the development and implementation of information technology standards.
Purpose
In 2003, LEITSC identified the need for a national standard for computer aided dispatch (CAD) functional specifications. They believed that the standard would accomplish the following goals:
 Provide a starting point for law enforcement agencies to use when developing CAD requests for proposal (RFP);
 Level the playing field when working with vendors; and
 Promote system interoperability (for example, CAD to CAD).

With these goals in mind, the LEITSC Functional Standards Committee, composed of law enforcement practitioners and industry experts from around the country, was appointed to develop the Standard Functional Specifications for Law Enforcement CAD Systems. The baseline document was developed from common elements found in requests for proposals, technical documentation, and other CAD-related research. The document was then validated by the group using a modeling tool. Once developed and validated, the specifications were vetted through the law enforcement community via each of the participating associations, as well as through other stakeholder communities in an effort to gain input from a number of different perspectives.
National Initiatives: Law Enforcement
Information Sharing Program
(LEISP), Law Enforcement National
Data Exchange (N-DEx), and Law
Enforcement Regional Data Exchange
(R-DEx)
As law enforcement agencies move toward the procurement of computer aided dispatch (CAD) and law enforcement records management systems (RMS), it is vital to recognize and consider the Law Enforcement Information Sharing Program (LEISP) developed by the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ). The LEISP is designed to promote information sharing among all levels of the law enforcement community and to guide the investment of resources in information systems that will further this goal. The goals of LEISP are supported through the proliferation of the Global Justice Information Sharing Initiative (Global) Extensible Markup Language (XML) Data Model (Global JXDM). For additional information on the Global JXDM, visit www.it.ojp.gov. The Global JXDM is an XML standard

Standard Functional Specifications for Law Enforcement Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) Systems

vii

designed specifically for justice information exchanges. It provides law enforcement, public safety agencies, prosecutors, public defenders, and the judicial branch with a tool to effectively share data and information in a timely manner. There are several ongoing DOJ initiatives incorporated into the LEISP.
One program currently being developed jointly between the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and state and local law enforcement is the Law Enforcement National Data Exchange (N-DEx) System. A second program— the Law Enforcement Regional Data Exchange (R-DEx) System—has been developed and implemented by the FBI. Both programs are new law enforcement information sharing systems based upon the above critical standards.
Document Scope
This document presents standard functional specifications for law enforcement CAD systems. The specifications found in this document are intended to be generic in nature rather than favor one particular system or approach over another; they are at the functional level, meaning that they define what is to be accomplished versus how it should be accomplished. These specifications were developed to depict the minimal amount of functionality that a new law enforcement CAD system should contain. They are not intended to simply be substituted for an RFP but should be tailored to fit the specific needs of each agency or group of agencies looking to purchase a new or upgrade an old CAD system. These specifications should be used as a starting point to build a fully functional (based on agency needs) CAD system that is based on open standards in order to efficiently interface and share information with other systems both internally and externally.
 The N-DEx Program is an incident- and case-based information sharing system (e.g., RMS) for local, state, tribal, and federal law enforcement agencies that securely collects and processes crime data in support of the investigative and analytical process and will provide law enforcement agencies with strategic and tactical capabilities that do not currently exist on a national scale. An N-DEx concept of operations (ConOps) document is being finalized to aid in the design of the N-DEx system and to ensure that stakeholders understand and share the N-DEx vision.
 The R-DEx Project seeks to securely share sensitive but unclassified crime information between federal agencies, while allowing for connection with several existing regionally based local and state information sharing systems to impede criminal and terrorist activities. R-DEx is now operational in several metropolitan areas.

It is expected that the process of defining detailed information exchanges in a CAD system will be addressed in future phases of this project. In addition, these specifications are intended to be used in conjunction with technical standards, including the Global JXDM, in order to streamline the process of sharing information.
It is intended that these standards will be updated and augmented on a regular basis.
Introduction
CAD systems allow public safety operations and communications to be augmented, assisted, or partially controlled by an automated system. It can include, among other capabilities, computer-controlled emergency vehicle dispatching, vehicle status, incident reporting, and management information.
All aspects of a CAD system must be optimized for rapid response time and system reliability. Since time is of the essence, the CAD system must accurately provide a data and time stamp for every activity.
CAD systems collect the initial information for an incident and then provide the information to one or more RMS systems.
The CAD system also supports other activities that assist in the effective use of public safety resources, including shift change roll call, “Be on the lookout” (BOLO) files, and the ability to schedule a call in the future.
This document addresses the following business functions:
 Law Enforcement Dispatch  CAD System Administrators  Support Services  Call Management and Management Reporting  Interfaces  EMS Dispatch  Fire Dispatch  Intelligent Transportation  Properties

viii Standard Functional Specifications for Law Enforcement Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) Systems

1

Business Function:
Law Enforcement Dispatch

1.1 Description:
Law enforcement agencies use CAD to facilitate incident response and communication in the field. CAD systems, in many cases, are the first point of entry for information coming into the law enforcement system. Typical CAD system functions include resource management, call taking, location verification, dispatching, unit status management, and call disposition. Additionally, mapping functionality, interface with mobile data computers (MDC), and interfaces with other external local, state, and federal information systems may be included. Call takers, dispatchers, and their supervisors are primary users of CAD. Units in the field may interact via mobile data computers.
1.2 Use Case Diagram (see page 2)
1.3 Use Case Specification: Call Taking
Calls for service (CFS) initiate the CAD process. Callers are citizens or other agencies requesting services from the agency or giving notification of events or activities of concern. A CFS may come from many different points of origin, such as alarm systems, E911 systems, direct calls (7- or 10-digit numbers), walk-ins, CAD-to-CAD interfaces, or Web-based systems.
The service requested by callers will consist of both emergency and nonemergency priorities. Call taking
 URL Integration collaborated with LEITSC to assist in the development of the functional standards. URL Integration used an alternative method to requirements analysis with their RequirementsModeler software. RequirementsModeler is based on Unified Modeling Language (UML), which is the de facto standard for documenting functional requirements. UML was created by the Object Management Group (OMG) in 1997 as a standard for visual object-oriented modeling. RequirementsModeler, consistent with UML principles, automatically generates diagrams and process flow (Use Case and Activity diagrams). URL Integration’s Use Case and Activity diagrams were reproduced for use in this report.

consists of receiving the call, obtaining sufficient and accurate information from the caller, determining whether this is a duplicate of a call in progress, and recording or updating the CFS in the CAD system. The call taker may also apply procedures and guidelines to verify, analyze, classify, and prioritize the call prior to routing the CFS to the dispatcher. A CFS may also be generated by a unit in the field. The unit can contact the dispatcher or the call taker, or he may actually create the call electronically using the optional mobile data terminal (MDT) interface. A CFS may be forwarded to a telephone reporting unit and be received from the telephone reporting unit. This may include the ability to create a CFS for future scheduled events.

Associated Actor
Caller
Unit Alarm External CAD
Call Taker

Relationship calls
initiates initiates calls
receives

Description
In jurisdictions with an E911 interface, the call taker still talks to the caller, but the data from the E911 interface reduces call entry time.
Business alarm or other optional interface provides data only.
An external CAD may communicate with a call center in another jurisdiction if those jurisdictions are under an agreement to work together and have a CAD-to-CAD interface.
In smaller agencies, the call taker may be the dispatcher.

Standard Functional Specifications for Law Enforcement Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) Systems



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Standard Functional Specifications for Law Enforcement