Technical Standards for International Mobile Telecommunication (IMT)


Download Technical Standards for International Mobile Telecommunication (IMT)


Preview text

TECHNICAL STANDARDS FOR
INTERNATIONAL MOBILE TELECOMMUNICATION (IMT) MTSFB 001 : 2010
© Copyright 2010 Malaysian Technical Standards Forum Bhd
i

TABLE OF CONTENTS Page

1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

5

2 SCOPE

6

3 OVERVIEW OF IMT TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT

6

3.1 International Mobile Telecommunication 2000 (IMT‐2000)...........................7

3.2 International Mobile Telecommunication ‐ Advanced (IMT‐Advanced).........7

3.3 Technology Neutrality ..................................................................................... 8

4 IMT NETWORKS DEPLOYED IN MALAYSIA

9

4.1 Telekom Malaysia (CDMA2000) ...................................................................... 9

4.2 DiGi (WCDMA / EDGE) ................................................................................... 10

4.3 Maxis Mobile (WCDMA / EDGE) .................................................................... 10

4.4 Celcom (WCDMA / EDGE).............................................................................. 11

4.5 U Mobile (WCDMA) ....................................................................................... 11

4.6 Packet‐1 (OFDMA TDD) ................................................................................. 12

5 IMT SPECTRUM BANDS

13

5.1 IMT Bands Adopted by Malaysia ................................................................... 13

6 IMT ADVANCED

14

6.1 IMT Advanced Overview................................................................................ 14

6.2 Status Update from Working Party 5D .......................................................... 14

6.3 IMT Technology Roadmaps and Timelines .................................................... 15

7 TECHNICAL STANDARDS FOR IMT2000

16

7.1 IMT‐2000 CDMA Direct Spread ..................................................................... 17

7.2 IMT CDMA Multi‐Carrier................................................................................ 20

7.3 IMT CDMA TDD .............................................................................................. 24

7.4 IMT TDMA Single Carrier ............................................................................... 26

2

7.5 IMT FDMA/TDMA (DECT) .............................................................................. 28

7.6 IMT OFDMA TDD WMAN............................................................................... 30

8 CONCLUSIONS

32

9 RECOMMENDATIONS

33

10 REFERENCE DOCUMENTS

34

11 ABBREVIATIONS

34

12 APPENDIX A NON‐IMT NETWORKS IN MALAYSIA

36

12.1 iBurst (or HC‐SDMA) ...................................................................................... 36

12.2 Flash‐OFDM ................................................................................................... 37

12.3 SOMA NETWORKS ......................................................................................... 38

3

Committee Representation The Working Group on International Mobile Telecommunication under whose authority this MTSFB technical standard was developed, comprises representatives from the following organisations:‐ Celcom (Malaysia) Berhad DiGi Telecommunications Sdn Bhd Jaring Communications Sdn Bhd Maxis Communications Bhd MIMOS Berhad Packet One Networks (M) Sdn Bhd Telekom Malaysia Berhad U Mobile Sdn Bhd Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM)
.
4

1 Executive Summary The purpose of this document is to review the Determination 5 of 2002 and the Variation Order of 2004 as to be kept updated with advances in ITU‐R recommendation referred to in ITU R‐REC‐ M.1457‐8‐2009. In Malaysia, the current IMT‐2000 air interface technologies are EDGE, WCDMA, CDMA2000, DECT and OFDMA TDD WMAN. Service providers such as Celcom, DiGi, and Maxis have deployed WCDMA/EDGE. While the widely deployed GSM technology is not defined part of IMT‐2000, EDGE is. U Mobile on the other hand only employs WCDMA. For CDMA2000 air interface, Telekom Malaysia is the current service provider while Packet‐1 deploys OFDMA TDD WMAN based on IEEE 802.16e. The other WiMAX service providers’ radio interface technologies are not readily known. In addition, DECT technology is mainly used for cordless phones for private use. The E‐UTRAN (LTE) is to be considered as part of the IMT‐2000 family of approved standards. The list above serves as an overview and do not hinder any service provider to deploy other IMT‐ 2000 technologies in the future. There are other non‐IMT wireless broadband technologies such as iBurst and FLASH‐OFDM which are commercially operating in IMT defined spectrum bands. Nevertheless this technology is serving a niche market. In view for the future telecommunication services in Malaysia, the IMT Work Group proposes the adoption of IMT technology neutrality concept. In our perspective, technology neutrality is defined as the use of any available IMT approved technology that provides such related services in the identified frequency bands. These IMT bands shall mean to include any new IMT bands identified at World Radio Conference (WRC) 2007, prior and beyond. Technical conditions for usage of IMT spectrum in Malaysia should be referred to the relevant Standard Radio System Plan (SRSP) documents. Considering the future of evolving technologies, the work group acknowledges the emerging “4G” supporting technologies such as LTE‐Advanced and 802.16m that are likely to be in the roadmap of existing service providers. These emerging technologies shall be classified in the future under the “IMT‐Advanced” standard. The work group recommends to SKMM that both Determination 2002 and Variation 2004 to be un‐mandated. A new document is recommended to be created (one such example is a Voluntary Industry Code) which shall include all existing six (6) IMT‐2000 approved technologies as radio interface technologies that can be potentially deployed in Malaysia in accordance to the relevant SRSP document. Additionally the status and usage of the IMT satellite bands will not be discussed as it is beyond the scope of this document.
5

INTERNATIONAL MOBILE TELECOMMUNCATIONS TECHNICAL STANDARD RECOMMENDATION
2 Scope The purpose of this document is to review the Determination 5 of 2002 and the Variation Order of 2004. The scope is to provide to SKMM advice, technical support and recommendations after reviewing the Determination 5 of 2002 and Variation of the Mandatory Standard registered in June 2004, Ref [2]. In addition, a recommendation on the working group position is presented. All arguments and justification to support the above recommendation is to be provided. The document compiles the radio technologies that exist in Malaysia. This is included in order to have a thorough understanding of status of the local industry. A network and service description is briefly elaborated for all the wireless broadband service providers in the nation. A chapter will provide an overview of the various IMT‐2000 standards including their characteristics, network architectures and physical layer features. The standards organization which is responsible for its development is highlighted. A brief overview of IMT Advanced (“4G”) is presented which covers its current development status. This is because the wireless technology is rapidly evolved and the industry should be kept updated on latest progress. Document scope exclusions: Satellite IMT component and non‐IMT technologies. Note: Recommendation ITU‐R M.1850 identifies satellite radio interface specifications for IMT‐ 2000 systems, was recently released on 8 Mar 2010.
3 Overview of IMT Technology Development The initiation of IMT Technology was due to the ‘globalization’ trend in all forms of communications, business, or even entertainment. Globalisation is necessary in order to have sufficient flexibility to meet local needs and to allow regional or national systems to evolve smoothly toward international involvement for wireless communications. Thus, the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) has the objective to develop a flexible standard and universal telecommunications infrastructure especially for wireless access. The standard should serve mobile and fixed users in both public and private networks. The ITU began its studies on global telecommunications in 1986, when the availability of handheld cellular phones offered the potential for worldwide usage, rather than just national, regional or only land mobile systems. Based on this globalisation vision, the ITU World Administrative Radio Conference in 1992 (WARC‐92) identified 1885‐2025 MHz and 2110‐2220 MHz including satellite components on a worldwide basis for the use of Future Public Land Mobile Telecommunication Systems (FPLMTS). Since it was scheduled to start service around the year 2000, FPLMTS was later changed to IMT‐ 2000 which stands for International Mobile Telecommunication‐2000. At time of writing, it has been agreed that spectrum currently allocated for exclusive use by IMT‐2000 technologies will now be known as just “IMT spectrum”.
6

3.1 International Mobile Telecommunication 2000 (IMT‐2000)
IMT‐2000 is also known as the third generation mobile systems. In order to differentiate IMT‐ 2000 from the former generation, Table 1 below compares the significant differences between the 2nd and 3rd generation mobile systems.

Aspect Digital Technology

Frequency bands

Commonality

for

different operating

environments

Roaming Technology

2nd Generation Systems
Digital technologies are used for • modulation • speech • channel • coding • data control • data channel
Operate in multiple frequency bands e.g. 800 MHz, 900 MHz, 1.5 GHz and 1.8 GHz

Primarily optimized for specific

operating environment such as

vehicular

and

pedestrian

environments.

Limited to specific region

Spectrum efficiency, overall cost and flexibility are limited by system design objectives

3rd Generations Systems (IMT‐2000) Increased used of digital technologies to programmable radios e.g. software defined radios.
Use of a common global frequency band for both terrestrial and satellite components e.g. 450‐470 MH, 698/790–806 MHz, 2300‐2400 MHz, 2500‐2690 MHz, 3400‐3600 MHz Maximizing commonality and optimization of radio interfaces for multiple operating environments i.e. vehicular, pedestrian, office, fixed wireless access and satellite operation Improved global roaming due to global frequency coordination. Those cost are improved as a result of building upon 2nd generation wireless system design experience

Table 1: Comparison of second and third generation mobile systems

3.2 International Mobile Telecommunication ‐ Advanced (IMT‐Advanced)
International Mobile Telecommunications – Advanced (IMT‐Advanced) systems are mobile systems that include the new capabilities of IMT that go beyond those of IMT‐2000. The following Table 2 compares key features between IMT‐2000 and IMT‐Advanced.

IMT‐2000 – ITU‐R‐REC‐M.1457 High degree of commonality of design world wide
Compatibility of services within IMT‐2000 and with the fixed networks High quality Small terminal for worldwide use Capability for multimedia applications, and a wide range of services and terminals Worldwide roaming capability

IMT‐Advanced – ITU‐R M.[IMT‐TECH] Aug 2008 High degree of commonality of design worldwide while retaining the flexibility to support a wide range of services and applications in a cost‐efficient manner Compatibility of services within IMT and with fixed networks High‐quality mobile services User equipment suitable for worldwide use User‐friendly applications, services and equipment
Worldwide roaming capability Capability of interworking with other radio access systems Enhanced peak data rates to support advanced

7

services and applications (100 Mbits/s for high and 1 Gbit/s for low mobility were established as targets for research) Table 2: Comparison of IMT‐2000 and IMT‐Advanced key features With reference to the above Table 2, it can be confirmed that IMT‐Advanced is just an enhancement features to the current IMT‐2000. The well known van diagram below briefly illustrates the relationship between IMT‐2000 and IMT‐Advanced.
Figure 1: Illustration of relationship of IMT‐2000 and IMT‐Advanced. Ref [4] 3.3 Technology Neutrality In view of the development of future telecommunication services in Malaysia, the IMT work group proposes the adoption of IMT technology neutrality concept. From our perspective, technology neutrality is defined as the use of any available IMT approved technology that provides such related services in the identified frequency bands. IMT spectrum bands are discussed in Section 6 below. The use of spectrum is governed by the Standard Radio System Plan (SRSP) document for each specific frequency band.
8

Preparing to load PDF file. please wait...

0 of 0
100%
Technical Standards for International Mobile Telecommunication (IMT)