Auckland Transport Code of Practice


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Auckland Transport Code of Practice 2013
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Auckland Transport Code of Practice 2013
10Traffic Signs and Road Markings
10.1 Introduction
The objective of traffic signs and road markings on roads is to guide and aid the safe and efficient movement of road users to their destinations. To achieve this, signs and markings must be clear, concise and easy for road users to understand. As such, signs and markings should be kept to a minimum to handle the driving task at that particular point on the road.
For public roads, Territorial Authorities are responsible for the provision, installation and maintenance of traffic signs and road markings.
This chapter provides clarity and consistency in the use of traffic signs and road markings throughout the Auckland region. Section 10.1 is an introduction. Sections 10.2 and 10.3 cover the general standards for Traffic Signs and Pavement Markings respectively. This chapter is not intended to cover all aspects in detail, but rather to provide general guidance.
The Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004 (TCD Rule) legislates signage and markings nationally. The Traffic Control Devices Manual (TCDM), and the Manual of Signs and Markings (MOTSAM), provides interpretive clarity and general specifications related to the TCD Rule. Where reference is made to these national standards the terminology TCD Rule and TCDM/MOTSAM are used. Reference to TCDM/MOTSAM includes reference to NZTA Traffic Notes.
The TCDM is being developed by NZTA on an ongoing basis and various sections of the TCDM have still to be published. Some sections of MOTSAM are still operative, but will in time be replaced by relevant new sections of the TCDM.
Notwithstanding the application of the TCDM, a Territorial Authority may introduce specific bylaws or rules relating to traffic signs and pavement markings. In the case of Auckland Council, these would be promulgated by Auckland Transport or be documented in the Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP). When adopted, the AUP will supersede the District Plans (DPs) of the previous TA’s that were amalgamated to form Auckland Council.
Until the Auckland Unitary Plan has legally replaced the above mentioned previous TAs’ District Plans, the appropriate sections of the DPs in this context relevant to signage will continue to be legally applicable. Similarly, until the bylaws of the above mentioned previous TAs have been replaced by new bylaws, the relevant previous TAs’ bylaws will still be legally applicable.
The use of TCDs should be limited to those that are legally required by the TCD Rule and those that AT identifies as essential for the guidance, safe and efficient movement of road users.
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Regulatory TCDs (both signs and markings) must be established through a legal process to be enforceable without the risk of challenge. TCDs covered by the bylaws must be resolved by the Traffic Control Committee (TCC). Guidance on this process is covered in AT’s Quick Guide to Preparation of Resolution Reports and Drawings (Resolutions Booklet Version 1 - August 2011. Other TCDs not covered by the bylaws may be established by delegated AT staff. In both cases the TCD proposal must be set out in a detailed report.

Various standards, specifications and guidelines are applicable to signs and markings. The specific documents referenced in this chapter are as follows:

• Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004 (TCD Rule); • Traffic Control Devices Manual (TCDM); • Manual of Traffic Signs and Markings (MOTSAM); • NZTA Traffic Notes • TNZ / NZTA Performance Specifications; • AS/NZS and RSMA Standards; • Auckland Transport’s Signage Guidelines • Austroads Guide to Traffic Management Part 10: Traffic Control and Communication
Devices (2009).

The maintenance of traffic signs and pavement markings must comply with ATCOP Chapter 25 – Maintenance.

Numerous abbreviations/acronyms are used throughout this chapter as follows:

ADS

Advance Direction Sign

AMP

Asset Management Plan

AT

Auckland Transport

ATCOP Auckland Transport Code of Practice

CAR

Corridor Access Request

CDS

Confirmation Destination Sign

COPTTM Code of Practice for Temporary Traffic Management

DP

District Plan

EJTS

Estimated Journey Time Sign

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EMS IDS ITS MOTSAM NZGB NZRF
NZTA OVRM PNS RAMM RARP RCA RIAWS RIS RSMA SED SH SID SNS SS STMS TA TCC

Electronic Message Sign Intersection Direction Sign Intelligent Transport System Manual of Traffic Signs and Markings New Zealand Geographic Board New Zealand Roadmarkers Federation New Zealand Transport Agency (formerly Transit New Zealand, TNZ) Over dimensional Vehicle Route Map Place Name Sign Road Asset Maintenance Management (system) Regional Arterial Road Plan Road Controlling Authority Rural Intersection Activated Warning Sign Route Indicator Sign Road Safety Manufacturers Association Standard Engineering Detail State Highway Speed Indication Device Street Name Sign Service Sign Site Traffic Management Supervisor Territorial Authority Traffic Control Committee

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TTM TCDM TCDR TS VMS

Temporary Traffic Management Traffic Control Devices Manual Traffic Control Devices Rule Tourist Sign Variable Message Sign

10.2 Traffic Signs
10.2.1 National and Best Practice Standards
Auckland Transport’s traffic signs must comply with the sign specifications of the TCDM Part 1 – General Requirements for Traffic Signs.
All traffic signs on AT’s network must comply with the best practice documents, standards and guidelines referenced in Section 10.1 and the following reference documents unless otherwise stated:
• New Zealand Transport Agency Traffic Control Device Manual (TCDM). The TCDM (which includes MOTSAM) provides interpretive clarity and general specifications related to the TCD Rule.
• TNZ P/24 Performance Based Specification for Traffic Signs • NZTA P/32 Electronic Warning Signs on State Highways • NZTA P/35 Specification for National VMS Operating Procedures • NZTA P/37 Specification for mobile variable message signs • Australia and New Zealand Standard AS/NZS 1906.1 and 1906.2 • RSMA Compliance Standard for Traffic Signs • NZ Building Code, Clause B1 – Structure • NZS 3404: Steel Structures • AS 1554, SAA Structural Steel Welding • AS 1650, SAA Hot Dip Galvanising Code • Z 450 Galvanising Standard • NZS 4203: Loading Standard • ACC Standard Engineering Details • Auckland Transport Drawings Series SM Drawings
It is essential that Auckland Transport’s Signage Guidelines (PDF 93KB) are read at the embedded hyperlink before reading the rest of this section.

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10.2.2 Traffic Sign Types
Traffic signs are classified by function into three main groups as follows:

• Regulatory (including general, parking and road user restrictions); • Warning (including temporary and permanent); • Advisory (including guide and route signs such as street name and community facilities,
tourist signs, service signs and general information signs).

Traffic signs are usually retro-reflective, but electronic (active light source) signs may be approved by Auckland Transport where warranted.

Regulatory, Warning and Advisory signs may be permanent or temporary.

Table 22, which follows, provides an overview of references for each sign type.

Table 22: General Signage Reference by Type - General Signs

Classification Sign Type

TCD Manual Reference

MOTSAM Reference

AT Guidance & Other Standards

Regulatory Signs

General

Part 1 - General Design Requirements

Part 1: Section 02 Regulatory Signs General

ATCOP Section 8.2

Parking

Part 1 - General Design Requirements

Part 1: Section 03 Regulatory Signs Parking

Quick Guide to preparation of Resolution Reports and Drawings (AT)

Vehicle Restriction

Part 1 - General Design Requirements

Part 1: Section 04 Regulatory Signs Heavy Vehicle

Warning Signs

Permanent Warning Signs

Part 1 - General Design Requirements

Part 1: Section 06 Permanent Warning Sign

NZTA Traffic Note 57 - Active Warning Signs (not at schools) Guidelines

Temporary Warning Signs

Part 8 - Code of Practice for Temporary Traffic Management

Part 1: Section 05 Temporary Warning Sign

NZTA Traffic Note 57 - Active Warning Signs (not at schools) Guidelines

Advisory Signs

Guide Signs (including Street Name Signs)

Part 1 - General Design Requirements Part 2 - Direction, Service and General Guide Signs

Part 1: Section 07 Regulatory Signs Guide Signs Part 3: Section 08 Overbridge Name Signs

ATCOP Section 8.2 RTS 14

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Classification Sign Type

TCD Manual Reference

MOTSAM Reference

AT Guidance & Other Standards

Motorist Service Signs

Part 1 - General Design Requirements Part 2 - Direction, Service and General Guide Signs

Part 1: Section 08 Regulatory Signs Motorist Service Signs Part 3: Section 09 Motorist Service Signs

Tourist Signs

Part 1 - General Design Requirements Part 2 - Direction, Service and General Guide Signs

Part 1: Section 09 Regulatory Signs Tourist Signs Part 3: Section 10 Tourist Signs

General Information Signs

Part 1 - General Design Requirements Part 2 - Direction, Service and General Guide Signs

Part 1: Section 10 Regulatory Signs General Information Signs

Electronic Signs

Variable Message Signs

Part 1 - General Design Requirements

Part 3: Section 1 Introduction

NZTA P/32 Specification for Electronic Warning Signs on State Highways

NZTA VMS Operating Policy (pending) National VMS Operating Procedures (pending) NZTA ITS Specification: Variable Message Sign COPTTM

NZTA – Traffic Note 37 – 40km/h variable speed limits in school zones (Revision 2)

NZTA Traffic Note 56 – Active School warning signs - guidelines

NZTA P/35 Specification for VMS National Operating Procedures

NZTA P/37 Specifications for mobile variable message signs

Lane Control Signs

Part 1 - General Design Requirements

NZTA P/32 Specification for Electronic Warning Signs on State Highways

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Classification Sign Type

TCD Manual Reference

MOTSAM Reference

Electronic Signs , continued

Variable Speed Limit Signs

Part 1 - General Design Requirements

Over Height Vehicle Warning Signs

Part 1 - General Design Requirements

Changeable Message Signs

Part 1 - General Design Requirements

Parking Direction Signs

Part 1 - General Design Requirements Part 13 - Parking Control

Part 1: Section 03 Regulatory Signs Parking

AT Guidance & Other Standards
NZTA ITS Specification: Lane Control System
NZTA P/32 Specification for Electronic Warning Signs on State Highways
NZTA ITS Specification: Lane Control System
NZTA P/32 Specification for Electronic Warning Signs on State Highways
NZTA ITS Specification: Variable Message Signs
Over dimensional Vehicle Route Maps (OVRM)
NZTA P/32 Specification for Electronic Warning Signs on State Highways
NZTA ITS Specification:
Variable Message Signs
NZTA P/35 Specification for VMS National Operating Procedures
NZTA P/37 Specifications for mobile variable message signs
NZTA P/32 Specification for Electronic Warning Signs on State Highways

10.2.3 Regulatory Signs
Regulatory signs instruct road users by requiring or prohibiting specified actions in using a road. They must comply with the requirements of the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004 (TCD Rule).
There are two types of regulatory signs:

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• Prohibitory – those indicating an action a road user must not take, e.g. no right turn. • Mandatory – those indicating an action a road user must take, e.g. stop
Regulatory signs must be installed to instruct road users of a requirement, restriction or prohibition on traffic at the following locations:
• At each point where the requirement, restriction or prohibition applies; or • Where the requirement, restriction or prohibition applies to a length of road:
o at the start; and o at the end; and o at intervals along its length, as specified in the Rule or other enactments (i.e.
clearway) ; and o on the side road approach e.g. at change of speed limit • Where the requirement, restriction or prohibition applies to a zone restriction at: o each entry point to the zone; and o intervals within the zone, as specified in the Rule; and o each exit point from the zone.
In addition, where a speed limit changes and at intervals within the speed limit area, AT will – in accordance with the Speed Limit Rule - provide a regulatory speed limit sign.
10.2.4 Warning Signs
Warning signs inform road users of permanent or temporary hazards on a roadway or give advance notice of features on or near a road. They must comply with the requirements of the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004 (TCD Rule).
There are two types of warning signs:
• Permanent warning signs, and • Temporary warning signs.
Appropriate temporary warning signs may also be mounted on vehicles.
Permanent Warning Signs
Permanent warning signs must be installed at any place where special care or reduced speed is appropriate, and in particular, consideration needs to be given in terms of appropriateness near the entrance to a school, kindergarten, preschool centre, hospital or other areas with vulnerable road users.
It should be noted that the TCD Rule states that a motor vehicle that is being used as a school bus must display a School Bus warning sign at the front and rear of the vehicle when the vehicle is operating and being used as a school bus.
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Temporary Warning Signs
Temporary warning signs are required where a temporary risk is likely to arise at any place on a road that may cause:
• Damage to the public or to road workers; or • Damage to the road.
Temporary Traffic Management (TTM) must comply with the Code of Practice for Temporary Traffic Management (COPTTM), by a qualified STMS of a sufficient level for the level of road. AT approval must be obtained through a Corridor Access Request (CAR). A temporary hazard, such as a disabled vehicle on the road, an accident, a slip, a washout or a broken transmission line, may require appropriate temporary warning signs to be erected by:
• Emergency services personnel; or • A worker involved in removing the temporary hazard, or in making the hazard area safe.
In addition to the hazard, temporary warning signs installed should not create additional hazards to pedestrians, cyclists or other road users. Alternative safe routes need to be provided where required.
10.2.5 Advisory Signs
Advisory signs provide road users with information or guidance on the intended use of the road. As with regulatory and warning signs, advisory signs must comply with the requirements of the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004 (TCD Rule). The TCD Manual (which includes MOTSAM) provides interpretive clarity and general specifications related to the TCD Rule. However, unlike regulatory and warning signs, there are generally more subjective/interpretive requirements within the specified standards for Advisory Signs. This section articulates Auckland Transport’s position and requirements when applying TCDM/MOTSAM or other relevant standards applicable to Advisory Signs.
There are special requirements related to applying for, installing and removing such signs. The application process is summarised below.
The guidelines provided in this chapter do not in any way negate other relevant Resource Consent requirements or bylaws related to signs.
Currently the District Plans (DP) of the legacy councils that were amalgamated to form Auckland Council may have additional requirements that need to be taken into account when assessing signage applications. For example, Section 16 of the legacy Rodney District Council DP requires a Resource Consent for the erection of any sign that is not located on the specific
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Auckland Transport Code of Practice