Soil organic Carbon Stock affected by different cropping


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International Journal of Environmental & Agriculture Research (IJOEAR)

ISSN:[2454-1850]

[Vol-8, Issue-6, June- 2022]

Soil organic Carbon Stock affected by different cropping system of Prayagraj District, Eastern Uttar Pradesh, India
Rashmi Raghav1*, S.B. Lal2, Ram Bharose3
Sam Higginbottom University of Agriculture, Technology and Sciences, Prayagraj-211007 (U.P.) *Corresponding Author
Received:- 10 May 2022/ Revised:- 25 May 2022/ Accepted:- 08 June 2022/ Published: 30-06-2022 Copyright @ 2022 International Journal of Environmental and Agriculture Research
This is an Open-Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted Non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract— Cropping system is an effective agricultural practice which play crucial role in soil carbon stabilization, soil health and fertility as well as in sequestering atmospheric CO2 in soil for long period of time. With these considerations in mind, a research was conducted in the Prayagraj district of eastern Uttar Pradesh to evaluate how major agricultural systems affect soil carbon stock. The major cropping system includes Wheat-Wheat, Mustard- Mustard, Rice-Wheat and Rice-Mustard Soil samples were collected from eight tehsil of Prayagraj district randomly from depth 0-15 cm and 15-30 cm depth. The findings show that soil organic carbon store in rice-wheat cropping systems is higher than in other cropping systems.
Keywords— Cropping system, Soil carbon stock, Atmospheric CO2, Carbon stabilization.
I. INTRODUCTION
The concentration of Co2 in earth’s atmosphere is currently at nearly 418.96 ppm in 2022 and rising (Mauna Loa observatory/NOAA). This represents a 47 percent increase since the beginning of industrial age when the concentration was near 280 ppm. CO2 increase caused by primarily human activities because carbon produced by burning of fossil fuels (Eawaran et al., 1993). Industry, transportation, and home use currently emit roughly 10 Gt CO2 into the atmosphere each year. Increasing SOC in agricultural systems has been considered as a possible solution to mitigate climate change, e.g., via removing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) into the long-lived C pool as it occupies 40% of the earth land surface (Smith 2008). Soil are important global carbon pools as it constitutes the third largest carbon pool estimated at 2500 Pg to 1 m depth so soil system has the potential to sequester significant amount of carbon by improved management, which could significantly offset fossil fuels GHG emissions (Lal 2004). Through changed agricultural techniques, it is proposed, much of this carbon can be restored to domesticated soils and thus serve as a significant tool to mitigate climate change, Soil carbon sequestration implies transferring atmospheric CO2 into long-lived pools and storing it in soil securely for long term to either mitigate or defeat global warming and avoid dangerous climate change so it is not immediately re-emitted (Lal et al., 1995). Simply we can say that soil carbon sequestration is the process of transferring carbon dioxide from the atmosphere into the soil through crop residues and other organic solids, and in a form that is not immediately reemitted (Jones 2007). More recently, increasing crop rotational diversity has been shown to play a major role in increasing SOC storage and ecosystem functions, driven by enhanced root C input, soil microbial diversity, and soil aggregate stability (McDaniel et al., 2014). Crop rotations can be further improved by incorporation of perennial forages with extensive root systems to increase root C input and physical protection in soil aggregates, resulting in SOC sequestration (Varvel 2000, Kelley et al., 2003).
II. MATERIALS AND METHODS
2.1 Study site
The field experiments were carried out at Prayagraj district located between 24° 47’ to 25° 47’ N latitudes and 81° 19’E to 82° 21’E longitudes. It covers an area of 5246 km2. This district lies in the southern part of the state in the Gangetic plain and adjoining Vindhyan Plateau of India. The district comprises of eight tahsils, namely Sadar tehsil, Soraon, Phulpur, Handia, Bara, Karchana, Koraon and Meja.Tahsil.
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International Journal of Environmental & Agriculture Research (IJOEAR)

ISSN:[2454-1850]

[Vol-8, Issue-6, June- 2022]

Table showing names of site description along with latitude and longitude of the Tehsil.

TABLE A TABLE SHOWING NAMES OF SITE DESCRIPTION

1

Meja

V1- Samahan, V2- Bisahijanpur, V3- Chatva upakhar, V4- Luter

2

Saroan

V 1- Naranyanpur, V2- Abdalpur, V3- Sarsa, V4- Gohri

3 Karchana V1- Rampur Talika, V2- Majhua, V3- Chuppepur, V4- Moongari

4

Handiya V1- Siyandih, V2- Bhadwan, V3-Birapur kasaudhan, V4- Shankerpur

5

Karoan

V1- Pacheda, V2- Semri baghrai, V3- Patharlal, V4- Taroan

6

Bara

V1- Barakhas, V2- Nivi, V3- Jharsa, V4- Sehunda

7

Phulpur

V1- Serdeh, V2- Karihar, V3- Kaserua, V4- Andhawa

8

Sadar

V1- Bamroli, V2- Jhalwa, V3- Fulwa, V4-Mandari

2.2 Soil Sampling and Analysis
Analysis of soil was done during grand growth of the crops. The soil samples were randomly collected from eight Tehsil of Prayagraj district and from each Tehsil four village were selected for the sampling. Soil sample were collected from each village with different cropping system i.e., Wheat-Wheat, Mustard- Mustard, Rice-Wheat and Rice- Mustard from 0-15 cm and 15-30 cm depth. The soil was returned to the laboratory after sample and air-dried at room temperature. The dirt was lowered in weight and sieved through a 2 mm mesh before being used for analysis.
Analysis of Bulk density (g/cc) by Muthuvel, et al., (1992), Organic carbon (%) and soil total organic carbon by Walkley and Black (1947) and soil organic carbon stock by Batjes (1996).
2.3 Carbon stock Analysis
2.3.1 Bulk density x soil depth x total organic carbon
Total organic carbon = %OC x 1.3
According to walkey and black method 77% is Organic matter
100÷77=1.29
Statistical analysis of variance F4 way classification was used and their after for comparing two objects together the value of critical difference was also analyzed.
III. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION
Table 1 shows the bulk density (g/cc) value of different cropping system at grand growth of Prayagraj district. The maximum value of bulk density was found 1.25 (g/cc) of village Fulwa in Sadar tehsil at 15-30 cm depth of rice-mustard cropping and minimum value of bulk density was found 1.00 (g/cc) of village Karihar in Phulpur tehsil at 0-15 cm depth of muatardmustard crop.
Table 2 shows the organic carbon (%) value of major crops at growing stage of Prayagraj district. The maximum value of organic carbon (%) was found 0.92 (%) of village Bisahijanpur in Meja tehsil at 0 to 15 cm depth of rice- wheat cropping system and minimum value of organic carbon (%) was found 0.11(%) of village Bhadwan in Handiya tehsil at 15 to 30 cm depth of wheat-wheat cropping system.
Table 3 shows the total organic carbon (%) value of major crops at grand growth stage of Prayagraj district. The maximum value of total organic carbon was found 1.18 (%) of village Kaserua in Phulpur tehsil at 0 to 15 cm depth of rice-wheat cropping system and minimum value of carbon stock was found 0.14 (%) in Handiya tehsil of village Bhadwan in Handiya tehsil at 15 to 30 cm depth of wheat-wheat cropping system. Table 4 shows the total organic carbon stock (t/ ha-1) value of major crops at grand growth stage of Prayagraj district. The maximum value of total organic carbon stock (t/ ha-1) was found 38.13 (t/ ha-1) of village Kaserua in Phulpur tehsil at 0 to 15 cm depth of rice-wheat cropping system and minimum value of total organic carbon stock (t/ ha-1) was found 5.06 (t/ ha-1) of village Bhadwan in Handiya tehsil at15 to 30 cm depth of wheat-wheat cropping system.

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International Journal of Environmental & Agriculture Research (IJOEAR)

ISSN:[2454-1850]

[Vol-8, Issue-6, June- 2022]

Many prior studies have indicated that more diversified crops improve soil organic carbon sequestration compared to mono cropping systems Gan YT et al., (2015); Campbell CA et al., 2005). Stabilization of soil organic carbon under various cropping systems; rice-wheat farming stabilises more soil organic carbon even without fertilizer (Stevenson, 1965; Paustian et al., 1992) and Brar and Benbi (2009).

TABLE 1 BULK DENSITY OF SOILS OF DIFFERENT CROPPING SYSTEM AT 0-15 CM AND 15-30 CM DEPTHS AT GROWING
STAGE OF MAJOR CROPS OF 2017-18.

Tehsils

Cropping system

(0-15 cm) depth

Mean

(15-30 cm) depth

Mean

V1 V2 V3 V4

V1 V2 V3 V4

Wheat/Wheat

1.11 1.01 1.02 1.11 1.06 1.20 1.11 1.18 1.14 1.16

Meja

Mustard/Mustard Rice/ wheat

1.10 1.08 1.10 1.11 1.10 1.22 1.18 1.25 1.18 1.21 1.08 1.01 1.11 1.01 1.05 1.14 1.11 1.18 1.11 1.14

Saroan

Rice/Mustard Wheat/Wheat Mustard/Mustard Rice/ wheat

1.25 1.01 1.11 1.11 1.12 1.18 1.11 1.18 1.20 1.17 1.14 1.11 1.18 1.11 1.14 1.20 1.22 1.25 1.18 1.21 1.10 1.20 1.11 1.12 1.13 1.18 1.24 1.17 1.25 1.21 1.08 1.11 1.11 1.10 1.10 1.18 1.20 1.23 1.18 1.20

Karchana

Rice/Mustard Wheat/Wheat Mustard/Mustard Rice/ wheat

1.00 1.08 1.01 1.11 1.05 1.18 1.18 1.11 1.16 1.16 1.18 1.14 1.10 1.18 1.15 1.20 1.20 1.24 1.24 1.22 1.10 1.11 1.11 1.11 1.11 1.17 1.18 1.20 1.18 1.18 1.11 1.11 1.01 1.11 1.08 1.18 1.15 1.17 1.25 1.19

Handiya

Rice/Mustard Wheat/Wheat Mustard/Mustard Rice/ wheat

1.18 1.14 1.11 1.11 1.14 1.22 1.25 1.18 1.18 1.21 1.11 1.08 1.01 1.01 1.05 1.11 1.18 1.14 1.20 1.16 1.18 1.11 1.14 1.18 1.15 1.20 1.18 1.25 1.33 1.24 1.12 1.01 1.06 1.02 1.05 1.20 1.18 1.17 1.20 1.19

karoan

Rice/Mustard Wheat/Wheat Mustard/Mustard Rice/ wheat

1.18 1.10 1.11 1.10 1.12 1.20 1.17 1.25 1.20 1.21 1.18 1.11 1.11 1.04 1.11 1.20 1.20 1.18 1.17 1.19 1.11 1.08 1.10 1.11 1.10 1.22 1.18 1.18 1.18 1.19 1.16 1.10 1.11 1.06 1.11 1.25 1.18 1.20 1.11 1.19

Rice/Mustard

1.08 1.11 1.01 1.07 1.07 1.11 1.18 1.11 1.18 1.15

Wheat/Wheat

1.18 1.14 1.01 1.10 1.11 1.25 1.24 1.16 1.20 1.21

Mustard/Mustard 1.14 1.18 1.11 1.16 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.18 1.25 1.22

Bara

Rice/ wheat

1.18 1.11 1.05 1.08 1.11 1.25 1.20 1.19 1.20 1.21

Phulpur

Rice/Mustard Wheat/Wheat Mustard/Mustard Rice/ wheat

1.11 1.20 1.16 1.11 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.20 1.33 1.25 1.01 1.01 1.00 1.08 1.02 1.11 1.11 1.12 1.18 1.13 1.08 1.00 1.11 1.11 1.08 1.18 1.20 1.21 1.25 1.21 1.01 1.10 1.01 1.10 1.05 1.11 1.14 1.11 1.17 1.13

Sadar

Rice/Mustard Wheat/Wheat Mustard/Mustard Rice/ wheat

1.11 1.12 1.08 1.11 1.11 1.18 1.19 1.20 1.20 1.19 1.08 1.11 1.16 1.15 1.13 1.18 1.18 1.20 1.20 1.19 1.14 1.08 1.11 1.11 1.11 1.20 1.18 1.20 1.24 1.21 1.11 1.18 1.17 1.18 1.16 1.20 1.20 1.25 1.20 1.21

Rice/Mustard

1.18 1.11 1.08 1.18 1.14 1.25 1.18 1.11 1.25 1.20

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International Journal of Environmental & Agriculture Research (IJOEAR)

ISSN:[2454-1850]

[Vol-8, Issue-6, June- 2022]

TABLE 2 SOILS ORGANIC CARBON (%) OF DIFFERENT CROPPING SYSTEM AT 0-15 CM AND 15-30 CM DEPTHS AT
GROWING STAGE OF MAJOR CROPS OF 2017-18.

Tehsils

Cropping system

(0-15 cm) depth

Mean

(15-30 cm) depth

Mean

V1 V2 V3 V4

V1 V2 V3 V4

Wheat/Wheat

0.4 0.85 0.56 0.51 0.58 0.3 0.46 0.4 0.49 0.41

Meja

Mustard/Mustard Rice/ wheat

0.38 0.67 0.49 0.32 0.47 0.22 0.45 0.39 0.4 0.37 0.45 0.92 0.73 0.7 0.70 0.36 0.62 0.51 0.54 0.51

Rice/Mustard

0.40 0.78 0.69 0.38 0.56 0.29 0.51 0.48 0.51 0.45

Wheat/Wheat

0.47 0.75 0.48 0.3 0.50 0.28 0.66 0.39 0.2 0.38

Saroan

Mustard/Mustard Rice/ wheat

0.32 0.6 0.23 0.6 0.44 0.22 0.32 0.36 0.12 0.26 0.69 0.41 0.73 0.72 0.64 0.40 0.12 0.56 0.50 0.40

Rice/Mustard

0.61 0.62 0.60 0.71 0.64 0.43 0.40 0.39 0.51 0.43

Wheat/Wheat

0.35 0.49 0.72 0.45 0.50 0.23 0.31 0.54 0.31 0.35

Karchana

Mustard/Mustard Rice/ wheat

0.42 0.47 0.7 0.31 0.48 0.22 0.38 0.48 0.2 0.32 0.37 0.52 0.75 0.48 0.53 0.29 0.40 0.58 0.35 0.41

Rice/Mustard

0.50 0.51 0.76 0.36 0.53 0.32 0.40 0.56 0.31 0.40

Wheat/Wheat

0.37 0.25 0.6 0.43 0.41 0.3 0.11 0.29 0.22 0.23

Handiya

Mustard/Mustard Rice/ wheat

0.31 0.27 0.32 0.3 0.30 0.21 0.21 0.23 0.25 0.23 0.40 0.31 0.61 0.47 0.45 0.36 0.20 0.59 0.31 0.37

Rice/Mustard

0.36 0.30 0.34 0.31 0.33 0.27 0.28 0.28 0.30 0.28

Wheat/Wheat

0.71 0.42 0.42 0.37 0.48 0.48 0.25 0.31 0.30 0.34

karoan

Mustard/Mustard Rice/ wheat

0.33 0.27 0.45 0.32 0.34 0.23 0.20 0.33 0.23 0.25 0.71 0.47 0.42 0.40 0.50 0.48 0.28 0.34 0.30 0.35

Rice/Mustard

0.36 0.28 0.50 0.29 0.36 0.27 0.20 0.34 0.28 0.27

Wheat/Wheat

0.42 0.40 0.46 0.61 0.47 0.28 0.21 0.35 0.42 0.32

Mustard/Mustard 0.48 0.41 0.52 0.62 0.51 0.37 0.32 0.34 0.30 0.33

Bara

Rice/ wheat

0.46 0.40 0.45 0.61 0.48 0.34 0.27 0.37 0.48 0.37

Rice/Mustard

0.50 0.43 0.57 0.68 0.55 0.38 0.35 0.47 0.60 0.45

Wheat/Wheat

0.57 0.53 0.87 0.72 0.67 0.46 0.38 0.70 0.52 0.52

Phulpur

Mustard/Mustard Rice/ wheat

0.76 0.80 0.88 0.71 0.79 0.40 0.69 0.61 0.50 0.55 0.58 0.57 0.91 0.78 0.71 0.56 0.40 0.81 0.61 0.60

Rice/Mustard

0.76 0.83 0.88 0.71 0.80 0.65 0.67 0.70 0.60 0.66

Wheat/Wheat

0.52 0.58 0.52 0.70 0.58 0.42 0.50 0.38 0.56 0.47

Sadar

Mustard/Mustard Rice/ wheat

0.52 0.58 0.42 0.61 0.53 0.41 0.48 0.32 0.45 0.42 0.57 0.60 0.51 0.72 0.60 0.50 0.47 0.42 0.56 0.49

Rice/Mustard

0.56 0.57 0.48 0.67 0.57 0.48 0.50 0.41 0.51 0.48

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International Journal of Environmental & Agriculture Research (IJOEAR)

ISSN:[2454-1850]

[Vol-8, Issue-6, June- 2022]

TABLE 3 SOILS TOTAL ORGANIC CARBON OF DIFFERENT CROPPING SYSTEM AT 0-15 CM AND 15-30 CM DEPTHS AT
GROWING STAGE OF MAJOR CROPS OF 2017-18.

Tehsils

Cropping system

(0-15 cm) depth

Mean

(15-30 cm) depth

Mean

V1 V2 V3 V4

V1 V2 V3 V4

Wheat/Wheat

0.52 1.11 0.73 0.66 0.39 0.39 0.60 0.52 0.64 0.54

Meja

Mustard/Mustard Rice/ wheat

0.49 0.87 0.64 0.42 0.29 0.29 0.59 0.51 0.52 0.47 0.59 1.20 0.95 0.91 0.47 0.47 0.81 0.66 0.70 0.66

Rice/Mustard

0.52 1.01 0.90 0.49 0.38 0.38 0.66 0.62 0.66 0.58

Wheat/Wheat

0.61 0.98 0.62 0.39 0.36 0.36 0.86 0.51 0.26 0.50

Saroan

Mustard/Mustard Rice/ wheat

0.42 0.78 0.30 0.78 0.29 0.29 0.42 0.47 0.16 0.33 0.90 0.53 0.95 0.94 0.52 0.52 0.16 0.73 0.65 0.51

Rice/Mustard

0.79 0.81 0.78 0.92 0.56 0.56 0.52 0.51 0.66 0.56

Wheat/Wheat

0.46 0.64 0.94 0.59 0.30 0.30 0.40 0.70 0.40 0.45

Karchana

Mustard/Mustard Rice/ wheat

0.55 0.61 0.91 0.40 0.29 0.29 0.49 0.62 0.26 0.42 0.48 0.68 0.98 0.62 0.38 0.38 0.52 0.75 0.46 0.53

Rice/Mustard

0.65 0.66 0.99 0.47 0.42 0.42 0.52 0.73 0.40 0.52

Wheat/Wheat

0.48 0.33 0.78 0.56 0.39 0.39 0.14 0.38 0.29 0.30

Handiya

Mustard/Mustard Rice/ wheat

0.40 0.35 0.42 0.39 0.27 0.27 0.27 0.30 0.33 0.29 0.52 0.40 0.79 0.61 0.47 0.47 0.26 0.77 0.40 0.47

Rice/Mustard

0.47 0.39 0.44 0.40 0.35 0.35 0.36 0.36 0.39 0.37

Wheat/Wheat

0.92 0.55 0.55 0.48 0.62 0.62 0.33 0.40 0.39 0.44

karoan

Mustard/Mustard Rice/ wheat

0.43 0.35 0.59 0.42 0.30 0.30 0.26 0.43 0.30 0.32 0.92 0.61 0.55 0.52 0.62 0.62 0.36 0.44 0.39 0.46

Rice/Mustard

0.47 0.36 0.65 0.38 0.35 0.35 0.26 0.44 0.36 0.35

Wheat/Wheat

0.55 0.52 0.60 0.79 0.36 0.36 0.27 0.46 0.55 0.41

Mustard/Mustard 0.62 0.53 0.68 0.81 0.48 0.48 0.42 0.44 0.39 0.43

Bara

Rice/ wheat

0.60 0.52 0.59 0.79 0.44 0.44 0.35 0.48 0.62 0.47

Rice/Mustard

0.65 0.56 0.74 0.88 0.49 0.49 0.46 0.61 0.78 0.59

Wheat/Wheat

0.74 0.69 1.13 0.94 0.60 0.60 0.49 0.91 0.68 0.67

Phulpur

Mustard/Mustard Rice/ wheat

0.99 1.04 1.14 0.92 0.52 0.52 0.90 0.79 0.65 0.72 0.75 0.74 1.18 1.01 0.73 0.73 0.52 1.05 0.79 0.77

Rice/Mustard

0.99 1.08 1.14 0.92 0.85 0.85 0.87 0.91 0.78 0.85

Wheat/Wheat

0.68 0.75 0.68 0.91 0.55 0.55 0.65 0.49 0.73 0.60

Sadar

Mustard/Mustard Rice/ wheat

0.68 0.75 0.55 0.79 0.53 0.53 0.62 0.42 0.59 0.54 0.74 0.78 0.66 0.94 0.65 0.65 0.61 0.55 0.73 0.63

Rice/Mustard

0.73 0.74 0.62 0.87 0.62 0.62 0.65 0.53 0.66 0.62

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International Journal of Environmental & Agriculture Research (IJOEAR)

ISSN:[2454-1850]

[Vol-8, Issue-6, June- 2022]

TABLE 4

SOILS ORGANIC CARBON STOCK (T/ HA) OF DIFFERENT CROPPING SYSTEM AT 0-15 CM AND 15-30 CM DEPTHS

AT GROWING STAGE OF MAJOR CROPS OF 2017-18.

Tehsils Cropping system

(0-15 cm) depth

Mean

(15-30 cm) depth

Mean

V1

V2

V3

V4

V1 V2 V3 V4

Wheat/Wheat 17.32 33.15 22.28 22.08 23.71 14.04 19.91 18.41 21.79 18.54

Meja

Mustard/Mustard Rice/ wheat

16.30 18.95

28.22 35.88

21.02 31.60

13.85 19.85 10.47 20.71 19.01 18.41 17.15 27.30 28.43 16.01 26.84 23.47 23.38 22.42

Rice/Mustard 19.50 30.42 29.87 16.45 24.06 13.35 22.08 22.09 23.87 20.35

Wheat/Wheat 20.90 32.47 22.09 12.99 22.11 13.10 31.40 19.01 9.20 18.18

Saroan

Mustard/Mustard Rice/ wheat

13.73 29.06

28.08 17.75

9.96 31.60

26.21 19.49 10.12 15.48 16.43 5.85 11.97 30.89 27.33 18.41 5.62 26.86 23.01 18.47

Rice/Mustard 23.79 26.11 23.40 30.74 26.01 19.79 18.41 16.88 23.07 19.54

Wheat/Wheat 16.11 21.79 30.89 20.71 22.37 10.76 14.51 26.11 14.99 16.59

Karchana

Mustard/Mustard Rice/ wheat

18.02 16.02

20.35 22.51

30.30 29.25

13.42 20.52 10.04 17.49 22.46 9.20 14.80 20.78 22.14 13.35 17.94 26.47 17.06 18.70

Rice/Mustard 23.01 22.67 32.90 15.58 23.54 15.23 19.50 25.77 14.27 18.69

Wheat/Wheat 16.02 10.53 23.40 16.77 16.68 12.99 5.06 12.89 10.30 10.31

Handiya

Mustard/Mustard Rice/ wheat

14.27 17.47

11.69 12.21

14.23 25.22

13.81 13.50 9.83 9.66 11.21 12.97 10.92 18.70 18.40 16.85 9.20 26.92 14.51 16.87

Rice/Mustard 16.57 12.87 14.72 13.30 14.36 12.64 12.78 13.65 14.04 13.28

Wheat/Wheat 32.67 18.18 18.18 15.01 21.01 22.46 11.70 14.27 13.69 15.53

karoan

Mustard/Mustard Rice/ wheat

14.29 32.12

11.37 20.16

19.31 18.18

13.85 14.70 10.94 9.20 15.19 10.58 11.48 16.54 21.75 23.40 12.89 15.91 12.99 16.30

Rice/Mustard 15.16 12.12 19.50 12.10 14.72 11.69 9.20 14.72 12.89 12.12

Wheat/Wheat 19.33 17.78 17.94 26.17 20.31 13.65 10.16 15.83 19.66 14.82

Mustard/Mustard 21.34 18.87 22.51 28.05 22.69 17.32 15.60 15.65 14.63 15.80

Bara

Rice/ wheat

21.17 17.32 18.43 25.69 20.65 16.58 12.64 17.17 22.46 17.21

Rice/Mustard 21.65 20.12 25.79 29.44 24.25 17.78 17.06 22.00 31.12 21.99

Wheat/Wheat 22.23 20.67 33.93 30.33 26.79 19.93 16.47 30.58 23.93 22.73

Phulpur

Mustard/Mustard Rice/ wheat

32.01 22.62

31.20 24.45

38.13 35.49

30.74 33.02 18.41 32.29 28.79 24.38 25.97 33.46 29.01 24.24 17.78 35.06 27.83 26.23

Rice/Mustard 32.93 36.25 37.07 30.74 34.25 29.91 31.09 32.76 28.08 30.46

Wheat/Wheat 21.90 25.11 23.52 31.40 25.48 19.33 23.01 17.78 26.21 21.58

Sadar

Mustard/Mustard Rice/ wheat

23.12 24.68

24.43 27.61

18.18 23.27

26.41 23.03 19.19 22.09 14.98 21.76 19.50 33.13 27.17 23.40 22.00 20.48 26.21 23.02

Rice/Mustard 25.77 24.68 20.22 30.83 25.37 23.40 23.01 17.75 24.86 22.26

Due to depth

Due to cropping system

Due to tehsil

Due to village

Result

S

S

S

S

S. ed.

0.61

0.87

1.23

0.87

CD at 5%

1.22

1.73

2.44

1.73

IV. CONCLUSIONS
The current study indicates that different cropping systems have significant impact on soil organic carbon stock. Soils under different cropping systems showed best results than monoculture crops. The study indicates that rice-wheat cropping system shows higher organic carbon stock than all other cropping systems and lowest in mustard-mustard cropping system.

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International Journal of Environmental & Agriculture Research (IJOEAR)

ISSN:[2454-1850]

[Vol-8, Issue-6, June- 2022]

Therefore, present study shows the different cropping system have a potential to enhance soil organic carbon and helpful in soil carbon stabilization.
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Soil organic Carbon Stock affected by different cropping