6 Facets of Cultural Differences


Download 6 Facets of Cultural Differences


Preview text

6 Facets of Cultural Differences

Understanding the different ways each culture answers the following will help us make friendships across cultures:

Where are we? The Importance of Context The role things like setting, process, body language, and appearance
play in communication.

High Context Cultures operate on the following:
The context of an event is as important as the event itself The listener is responsible for understanding communication There is no distinction between the idea and the person Experience is equal in value to fact Life is viewed holistically

Low Context Cultures operate on the following:
The content of the message is more important than the context The speaker is responsible for the communication People are defined by their recent achievements Analytical thinking is preferred

What Drives Us? The Value of Activity How does the culture group define and understand activity? Doing cultures value results and products; being cultures value relationships and quality of life.

Who’s in Charge? The Influence of Authority Is equal treatment expected, or is a hierarchy the norm?

Who Am I? The Source of Identity Do people tend to view themselves as individuals, separate from family or community? Or do they seem themselves as part of a group?

When Do We Start? Our Sense of Time

What’s Really Real? Differences in Worldview

From Lane, Patty. A Beginner’s Guide to Crossing Cultures. Downers Grove: Intervarsity Press, 2002.

6 Facets of Cultural Differences

Understanding the different ways each culture answers the following will help us make friendships across cultures:

Where are we? The Importance of Context The role things like setting, process, body language, and
appearance play in communication.

High Context Cultures operate on the following:
The context of an event is as important as the event itself The listener is responsible for understanding communication There is no distinction between the idea and the person Experience is equal in value to fact Life is viewed holistically

Low Context Cultures operate on the following:
The content of the message is more important than the context The speaker is responsible for the communication People are defined by their recent achievements Analytical thinking is preferred

What Drives Us? The Value of Activity How does the culture group define and understand activity? Doing cultures value results and products; being cultures value relationships and quality of life.

Who’s in Charge? The Influence of Authority Is equal treatment expected, or is a hierarchy the norm?

Who Am I? The Source of Identity Do people tend to view themselves as individuals, separate from family or community? Or do they seem themselves as part of a group?

When Do We Start? Our Sense of Time

What’s Really Real? Differences in Worldview

From Lane, Patty. A Beginner’s Guide to Crossing Cultures. Downers Grove: Intervarsity Press, 2002.

Preparing to load PDF file. please wait...

0 of 0
100%
6 Facets of Cultural Differences