Technical guidelines for participatory village mapping exercise


Download Technical guidelines for participatory village mapping exercise


Preview text

Technical guidelines for participatory village mapping exercise

Manuel Boissière Amy E. Duchelle

Stibniati Atmadja Gabriela Simonet

Technical guidelines for participatory village mapping exercise
Manuel Boissière
Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) and the French Agricultural Research Centre for International Development (CIRAD)
Amy E. Duchelle
CIFOR
Stibniati Atmadja
CIFOR
Gabriela Simonet
French National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA) and CIFOR
Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR)

© 2018 Center for International Forestry Research DOI: 10.17528/cifor/007282
Content in this publication is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0), http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Boissière M, Duchelle AE, Atmadja S and Simonet G. 2018. Technical guidelines for participatory village mapping exercise. Bogor, Indonesia: CIFOR. 19 pp.
Cover photo by Manuel Boissière Participatory mapping in Mamberamo (Papua/Indonesia)
CIFOR Jl. CIFOR, Situ Gede Bogor Barat 16115 Indonesia T  +62 (251) 8622-622 F  +62 (251) 8622-100 E [email protected]
cifor.org
We would like to thank all donors who supported this research through their contributions to the CGIAR Fund. For a list of Fund donors please see: http://www.cgiar.org/about-us/our-funders/ Any views expressed in this publication are those of the authors. They do not necessarily represent the views of CIFOR, the editors, the authors’ institutions, the financial sponsors or the reviewers.

Contents

Acknowledgements

v

1 Introduction

1

2 The maps

2

2.1 The base map

2

2.2 The map from satellite imagery

2

2.3 The map on drafting paper

3

3 Checklist of materials

4

4 Mapping activity with key informants in the small discussion group

5

4.1 Preparing a copy of the base map on drafting paper before starting the activity: 5

4.2 Adding basic information on the copy of the base map on drafting paper:

6

4.3 Introducing the activity to key informants:

6

4.4 Familiarizing key informants with the map:

6

4.5 Asking key informants to update the map:

6

4.6 Asking key informants to answer the Village survey questions:

6

4.7 Finalizing the map:

7

5 Mapping activities during village and women’s meetings

9

5.1 Before starting the activity with the meeting participants:

9

5.2 Preparation of the activity:

9

5.3 Familiarizing the participants with the map and requesting updates:

9

5.4 Asking the respondents to answer the survey questions:

11

5.5 After the group discussion:

11

6 Finalizing the maps after fieldwork

12

References

13

iv
List of figures

1 Preparing a copy of the base map on drafting paper.

5

2 Drawing landscape features with villagers on the copy of the base map using

drafting paper.

7

3 A land tenure map on drafting paper.

8

4 An example of a figure legend.

8

5 Participatory mapping process.

10

6 Clean map.

10

7 Workflow for the village mapping exercise.

12

v
Acknowledgements
This activity is part of CIFOR’s Global Comparative Study (GCS) on REDD+ (CIFOR 2017). The funding partners that have supported this study include the Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (Norad), the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT), the European Commission (EC), the International Climate Initiative (IKI) of the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, Building and Nuclear Safety (BMUB), the United Kingdom Department for International Development (UKAID), and the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry (CRP-FTA), with financial support from the donors contributing to the CGIAR Fund. The authors would like to thank all those who have provided input and comments during the preparation of this document, and the GCS REDD+ field teams that applied these methods in the field.

1  Introduction

This participatory mapping exercise was prepared for the third phase of CIFOR’s Global Comparative Study (GCS) on REDD+. It is part of the research component that has evaluated the impacts of locallevel REDD+ interventions on forests and people since 2010, through a Before–After Control–Intervention (BACI) approach. Detailed methods on this research component can be found in a CIFOR publication (Sunderlin et al. 2016). This participatory mapping exercise was developed after identifying the need to have a more systematic way of documenting land use and tenure arrangements across our various field sites.
Reference is made in the present document to GCS REDD+ fieldwork, but the guidelines are meant, more generally, for researchers, field research supervisors and enumerators who have never developed maps with the participation of local communities. They are based on several documents and projects led by CIFOR using participatory mapping as one of the tools to learn about local perceptions of the landscape and local peoples’ perspectives of forest and land management (van Heist 2000; Sheil et al. 2002; Anau et al. 2003; Boissière et al. 2007; Padmanaba et al. 2012; Kingsolver et al. 2017).

In the context of GCS REDD+ field research, this participatory mapping exercise provides a way to collect data on questions related to land use and tenure found in the village and women’s questionnaires, and to crosscheck village boundary data that were compiled in previous research phases. In other contexts, such maps can be used as a basis for discussions on land use (Padmanaba et al. 2012), or to decide with local communities about where indepth field surveys should take place (Boissière et al. 2010).
The mapping exercise is part of three GCS REDD+ activities in each study village: (1) a small group discussion with at least three key informants to learn about village boundaries, tenure, areas under dispute, access (roads) and market location; (2) village meetings with 10–15 adult men and women; and (3) women’s meetings with 10–15 adult women. The mapping exercise is conducted during the small group discussion, but the result of the initial mapping exercise is used for the village and women’s meetings.

1

2  The maps

The mapping exercise requires a base map that needs to be prepared in advance by a Geographic Information System (GIS) specialist, with village location and boundaries (as Shapefiles) obtained during the previous research phases via secondary data sources or mapping with villagers when spatial information on village boundaries was not available (see Sunderlin et al. 2016, 66–67).
Three maps are needed for the mapping exercise: a base map, a satellite image/map and a copy of the base map on drafting paper.
2.1  The base map
The base map is a bare-bones map, with the minimum number of features needed to orient key informants to locations of interest. The GIS specialist extracts these features from the satellite images (e.g. Landsat, Sentinel or any other free and most recent satellite images available for the different sites). The base map is printed on A0 format (841×1189 mm) paper, which helps to include a maximum number of landmarks and names. The following list indicates a number of landmarks and other features, not exhaustive, to be included on the base map: a. settlements position (e.g. main village,
hamlets, huts) b. roads, paths, airports/airstrips c. religious buildings (e.g. churches, mosques,
traditional houses) if visible on the satellite image (or if the position using a Global Positioning System (GPS) was provided during a previous field survey) d. any other building known by all the villagers (e.g. government office, communal building, cooperative, school), if visible on the satellite image (or if GPS position was provided during a previous field survey) e. rivers, streams, ponds, lakes

f. mountains, peaks (visible on the map based on the satellite image, but only with an icon, for example, a triangle, on the base map)
g. geographical coordinates (use preferably Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM))
h. village boundaries identified during previous field visits.
This list can be adapted to the features considered to be important for each of the sites/countries. It is important to include all these features on the base map to make the map easily understood by the key informants and other respondents so that they know where to draw when asked by the field research supervisors/enumerators.
2.2  The map from satellite imagery
A map based on satellite imagery will be used to support discussions with villagers. It will have minimal interpretation, because otherwise it would be too ‘busy’ and time consuming to prepare. It contains the same landmarks from the base map, and the geographical coordinates are made visible to aid the digitization after fieldwork. Minimal interpretation will be done by the GIS specialist and can include areas of forest vs non-forest, settlements and water bodies. Information from satellite interpretation are only indicative, and not definitive. This map will serve to cross-reference villagers’ answers to the survey questions (e.g. presence of degraded forest, areas of land conversion).
Ideally, this map is printed in color with high resolution on an A0 sheet of paper to allow overlay on the base map. The highest-resolution, cloud-free satellite images available for the study site should be used. The resulting map image should be printed using glossy paper or laminated to protect it from moisture. If too costly or

2

Preparing to load PDF file. please wait...

0 of 0
100%
Technical guidelines for participatory village mapping exercise