CRANE MANUAL (Operations, maintenance and safety)


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The Deeside Railway Crane Manual

CRANE MANUAL (Operations, maintenance and safety)

29/3/2007

The Deeside Railway Company Limited
1

The Deeside Railway Crane Manual
Crane Manual
Contents

1

OVERVIEW

2

RESPONSIBILITIES

2.1 Company Directors

2.2 Duty manager

2.3 Crane operator and Banksman

3

PERSONNEL COMPETENCE, QUALIFICATIONS AND CERTIFICATION

3.1 Operator

3.2 Banksman

4

CRANE BASICS

4.1 Crane and boom types

4.2 Crane moments

4.3 Stability

4.4 Mechanical principles

4.5 Load moments

4.6 Reeving

4.7 Winches

4.8 Radius and boom angle

4.9 Safe Working Loads

4.10 Limit switches

4.11 Static and dynamic loads

4.12 Rated capacity Indicators

5

PRIME MOVER

5.1 Diesel engine

5.2 Speed governor

5.3 Lubrication system

5.4 Filters

5.5 Cooling system

5.6 Air cleaner

5.7 Starting system

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WIRE ROPES

6.1 Factor of safety

6.2 Construction

6.3 Multi-stranded rope

6.4 Breaking load – size relationship

6.5 Strength and flexibility

6.6 Rope removal criteria

6.7 Factors causing rope deterioration

6.8 Inspection

6.9 Critical points

6.10 End attachments

6.11 Measuring diameter

6.12 Measuring rope lay

6.13 Finding broken wires

6.14 Making an internal rope examination

6.15 Fleet angle

6.16 Inspecting Sheaves / pulleys

6.17 Evaluating drums

6.18 Replacing wire ropes

6.19 Steel wire rope summary

7

GENERAL PROCEDURES

7.1 Personnel safety equipment

7.2 Rigging store

7.3 Access to working area

7.4 Load charts

7.5 Signals and communications

7.6 Crane movements along the track

7.7 Overhead power lines

7.8 Emergency procedures

7.9 Shutdown

7.10 Electrical safety

7.11 Troubleshooting

8

PRE-LIFTING PROCEDURES

8.1 Worksite planning

8.2 Crane pre-start check

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The Deeside Railway Crane Manual
9 LIFTING PROCEDURES 9.1 Lifting operations 9.2 Operation of controls 9.3 Checks during lifting operations 9.4 General techniques 9.5 Use and abuse of safety devices 9.6 Crane operations checklist
10 CRANE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE 10.1 Routine maintenance 10.2 Annual certification 10.3 Maintenance activities
11 APPENDICES 11.1 Glossary 11.2 Hand signals 11.3 Load chart 11.4 Basic crane data 11.5 Lift plan pro-forma 11.6 Daily pre-operation check list 11.7 Routine maintenance check lists 11.8 Crane end elevation drawing - front 11.9 Crane end elevation drawing - rear 11.10 Crane side elevation drawing 11.11 Troubleshooting chart 11.12 Electrical diagrams 11.13 The Wylie Safe Load Indicator manual 11.14 Lifting Operations legislation 11.15 Hook height profile 11.16 Polyester sling rating

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The Deeside Railway Crane Manual
1. OVERVIEW
The crane in use by the Royal Deeside Railway is a diesel-electric type, built in 1961 at Rodley, Leeds by Thomas Smith & sons Ltd. Load capacity is 6 tons at the maximum radius of 33 feet, 10 tons at 25 feet in to the minimum radius of 15 feet. Total crane weight is 75 tons. The manufacturer has ceased trading and little original operating data is available. See Appendix 3 – Crane basic data. A full set of ‘as-built’ electrical drawings have been prepared and are available for maintenance purposes.
All crane functions are electrically powered from a 55 kW diesel-electric generator operating at 440 volts DC. A 24 volt DC utility circuit is available for crane lighting and engine starting.
The jib winch has a non-progressive spring loaded brake, electrically held off when the jibbing motor is energised.
The slewing motor drives through a friction clutch to prevent side loading of the jib and minimise obstruction impact damage to the crane body. A slew foot brake is fitted to the motor side of the friction clutch, no other slew brake is provided.
The hoist winch has a non-progressive spring loaded brake, electrically held off when the hoist motor is energised. A hoist foot brake is also provided.
A traction motor is fitted to each of the two bogies, each driving a single axle through a reduction gearbox. Each traction motor has a non-progressive spring loaded brake, electrically held off when the motor is energised. A manually operated parking brake operating on a non-driven axle is also provided.
All crane motors are directly switched by the drum controllers operated by the control handles, with the exception of the traction system. The traction motor operating lever and associated drum controller provide control currents to operate the sequencing contactors in the travel speed relay control panel, and use timers in conjunction with the control handle position to manage the rate of travel speed increase.
Various trip functions are fitted to prevent: excessive jibbing in either direction, overhoisting of the block, excessive motor current, incorrect operating lever position at start-up, etc. These trips operate by de-energising the main contactor coil, allowing the main contactor to open and shutting down the high voltage supply to all motors.
A Wylie Safe Load Indicator is fitted to provide a warning and alarm facility for overload conditions at any position between the maximum and minimum working radii. A warning bell and indicator light test facility is also provided.

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The Deeside Railway Crane Manual
2. RESPONSIBILITIES
2.1 Company Directors
Company Directors are responsible for ensuring that appropriate safety management systems and procedures are in place for :
personnel training – to ensure all operators and banksmen receive training appropriate to the activities in which they are involved, personnel competence assessment – to ensure that all operators and banksmen are sufficiently competent to handle the tasks they are involved with, equipment certification – to ensure that the crane and all lifting equipment such as slings, shackles and ropes have been independently assessed for fitness for purpose in accordance with Statutory requirements, and are in date. equipment maintenance and inspection – to ensure that all crane functions operate correctly at all times and remain safe to use, operating procedures – to ensure that all lifting activities, crane movements and maintenance activities are carried out in a safe manner, systems auditing – to validate that all the above safety management systems are being applied correctly.
2.2 Duty Manager
The Duty Manager is responsible for ensuring that the operator and banksman working the crane are currently certified as competent, according to company records.
2.3 Crane operator and Banksman
The crane operator and banksman are responsible for carrying out their duties in accordance with the training and certification provided.

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The Deeside Railway Crane Manual
3. PERSONNEL COMPETENCE, QUALIFICATIONS AND CERTIFICATION
3.1 Operator The minimum qualifications for a volunteer approved to operate a crane are as follows:
- have corrected vision that meets the same requirements as vision for a driver’s licence. - have effective use of all four limbs. - be of sufficient height to operate the controls and to have an unobstructed view over the controls into the work area. - have suitable coordination between eyes, hands, and feet. - be free of known convulsive disorders and episodes of unconsciousness. - have the ability to understand signs, labels, and instructions.
The volunteer must have undertaken an approved course of training in crane operations, been assessed as competent, and be registered in the Company database of competent personnel.
3.2 Banksman The minimum qualifications for a volunteer selected to work as banksman are as follows:
- have corrected vision that meets the same requirements as vision for a driver’s licence.
- have effective use of all four limbs. - have the ability to understand signs, labels, and instructions.
The volunteer must have undertaken an approved course of training as banksman, been assessed as competent, and be registered in the Company database of competent personnel.
3.3 Maintenance Personnel All maintenance and engineering activities on the crane must be carried out by personnel authorised as competent.

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The Deeside Railway Crane Manual
4 CRANE BASICS
4.1 Crane and boom types

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The Deeside Railway Crane Manual
4.2 Crane movements Cranes are machines that are designed/used to lift loads. This is their main purpose. Most cranes can also move and position loads.
It can be said that most cranes can LIFT loads VERTICALLY and MOVE loads HORIZONTALLY.
There are many different types and sizes of cranes from many different manufacturers. The type of crane which this manual deals with is known as the boom type crane, sometimes called jib crane.
There are also different types of BOOM.
Many manufacturers have their own special equipment or systems to achieve the way in which the crane works but, whatever the method used, cranes perform only three basic functions, namely
- VERTICAL Movement is carried out by the crane's HOIST (and lowering) function
- HORIZONTAL Fore and Aft Movement is carried out by the cranes BOOM HOIST function, sometimes called DERRICKING or LUFFING.
- HORIZONTAL Movement is also carried out using the cranes SWING (or SLEWING) function.
Basically the load that a crane can lift depends upon two or more of the following points:
1. How big is it ?
2. How heavy is it ?
3. How strong is it ? (structurally)
4. How much power is available ?

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CRANE MANUAL (Operations, maintenance and safety)