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LEWIS UNIVERSITY
Undergraduate
Curriculum Guide 2004-2005

LEWIS UNIVERSITY

LEWIS AT A GLANCE

O U T S TANDING ACADEMIC PRO G R A M S
Lewis University is a comprehensive Catholic university, located southwest of Chicago, where the traditions of liberal learning, values, and preparation for professional work come together with a synergy that gives the University its educational identity and focus. Founded in 1932, Lewis is a dynamic, coeducational university offering more than 60 undergraduate majors, 12 graduate programs, and certificates of advanced study. Lewis is one of many institutions sponsored by the De La Salle Christian Brothers, an international Roman Catholic teaching order.

State Board of Education in conjunction with the Illinois State Teacher Certification Board. In addition, the School of Education has earned NCATE (National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education) accreditation. Inquiries concerning regional accreditation should be directed to the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois, 60602-2504. By phone, (800) 621-7440 or (312) 263-0456.
This institution is regulated by The Indiana Commission on Proprietary Education, 302 W Washington Street, room E 201, Indianapolis, IN 46204-2767. (800) 227-5695 or (317) 232-1320.

E X P E R I E N C E D FAC U LT Y Lewis has nearly 140 full-time faculty members who take their students’ personal and professional success to heart. The greater majority hold terminal degrees in their fields. Many are experienced practitioners. The student/faculty ratio is 15:1.
ACCREDITAT I O N Lewis University is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association. The College of Nursing and Health Professions’ basic professional program is approved by the State of Illinois Department of Professional Regulation, and all nursing programs, graduate and undergraduate, are fully accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (One Dupont Circle, Washington DC, 20036) for the 10-year maximum term. Department of Aviation programs are approved by the Federal Aviation Administration under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR): Approved Dispatcher Program, Approved Flight School, and Approved Aviation Maintenance Technician School. All teacher education programs are approved for entitlement by the Illinois

A WELCOMING CAMPUS The Lewis main campus in Romeoville, Illinois, is a picturesque 350-acre setting which houses 1,000 students in eight residence halls, all within walking distance of well-equipped classrooms, the library, the Student Recreation and Fitness Center, the Student Union, and Sancta Alberta Chapel. Lewis suburban campuses are located in Oak Brook, Schaumburg, Hickory Hills and Tinley Park. All campuses are easily accessible to corporate offices in Chicago and the suburbs, making it easy for students to complete professional internships.
E N RO L L M E N T Lewis currently has approximately 4,600 students: 3,400 undergraduates and 1,200 graduates. Many are from the Chicago region with international students representing 30 different countries. Lewis welcomes students of all cultures and religious faiths, with a 30 percent minority population, and a ratio of 60 percent Roman Catholic to 40 percent other Christian/non-Christian faiths.

WWW.LEWISU.EDU (800) 897-9000

MISSION STATEMENT
Faithful to the Lasallian Heritage in Catholic Higher Education

Lewis University, guided by its Catholic and Lasallian heritage, provides to a diverse student population programs for a liberal and professional education grounded in the interaction of knowledge and fidelity in the search for truth.
Lewis promotes the development of the complete person through the pursuit of wisdom and justice. Fundamental to its Mission is a spirit of association which fosters community in all teaching, learning and service.

KNOW L E D G E
The result of a lifelong pursuit of learning fostered through creative and critical interaction in a community of learners.

FIDELITY
The spirit which recognizes God as ultimate reality, unifying the diverse forms of knowledge in the pursuit of fullness of truth, while recognizing the diversity of human experience.

WISDOM
The result of the integration of reflection and action developed through higher learning throughout all of life.

JUSTICE
The affirmation of the equal dignity of every person and the promotion of personal and social responsibility.

A S S O C I ATION
The process of forming a community of mutual respect, collegiality, collaboration and service.

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LEWIS UNIVERSITY
GENERAL INFORMATION

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HISTORY OF LEWIS UNIVERSITY
H I S TO RY OF LEWIS UNIVERSITY
Inspired by its Catholic and Lasallian heritage, Lewis University offers a values-centered curriculum, rich in the Mission values of knowledge, fidelity, wisdom and justice and guided by the spirit of association which fosters community in all teaching, learning and service. To its nearly 4,400 students, Lewis provides programs for a liberal and professional education based on the interaction of knowledge and fidelity in the search for truth.
Lewis is a dynamic, coeducational, comprehensive, Catholic university with a richly diverse student body, including traditional-aged students, as well as adults of all ages, students who attend classes at the main campus in Romeoville and at sites throughout the Chicagoland area.
Founded in 1932 under the direction of the Chicago Archdiocese and Bishop Bernard J. Sheil, Lewis began as the Holy Name Technical School, a school for boys, which opened with 15 students. The school was established on a campus of 160 acres of farmland that was donated to the archdiocese by Michael and Frances Fitzpatrick of Lockport. From the beginning, Frank J. Lewis, the noted Chicago philanthropist and industrialist, took an active interest in the school. He assisted with the funding of various buildings that became the nucleus of the University.
During these early days, aviation technology courses were the special emphasis of instruction and are the origin of today’s highly regarded Department of Aviation. The school was incorporated in 1934 under the name Lewis Holy Name Technical School. In 1935, it became the Lewis Holy Name School of Aeronautics, a name which is engraved in stone on the building now known as the Oremus Fine Arts Center.

LEWIS UNIVERSITY
By 1940, with the impending threat of World War II, the newly named Lewis School of Aeronautics began emphasizing programs of direct utility to the armed forces. The high school department closed in 1942, and the campus was given over to the U.S. Navy for its flight instructors program. By the end of the war, 1,200 men had received pilot training at Lewis. The suspension of academic activities gave the Lewis administration and faculty an opportunity to rethink the school’s objectives. As a consequence, when regular classes resumed in the autumn of 1944, the reorganized school included a junior college. As returning servicemen increasingly sought further education, the school’s offerings quickly evolved into a traditional arts and sciences curriculum. By 1949, women also were admitted as students, and high school classes were discontinued. More appropriately named, the Lewis College of Science and Technology granted its first baccalaureate degrees in 1952. For the rest of the decade, enrollment grew steadily.
A new phase in the history of Lewis began in 1960 when the Brothers of the Christian Schools assumed direction of the institution at the invitation of Bishop Martin McNamara of Joliet. As members of a 320-year-old religious congregation devoted exclusively to teaching, the De La Salle Christian Brothers brought to Lewis a new tradition of Lasallian values, based on the teachings of Saint John Baptist de La Salle, their founder. The first group of Lasallian Brothers on campus successfully combined their efforts with those of the dedicated lay faculty to inaugurate a program of major improvements. The institution became Lewis College in 1962 and achieved accreditation by the North Central Association in 1963.
The growth of higher education in the 1960s was reflected in the school’s rapidly increasing enrollment, which reached 2,000 students by 1970. To accommodate the larger student body,

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GENERAL INFORMATION
a major construction program was initiated to create new classrooms and laboratories, two residence halls, the Learning Resource Center, a gymnasium, and a modern aviation technical center.
A dialogue concerning possible merger with the College of St. Francis was initiated in 1968, resulting in a high degree of cooperation between the two colleges. Although the merger did not occur, this cooperation was reflected during the 1970-71 academic year by the use of the name Lewis-St. Francis of Illinois.
Two major organizational changes became effective in the fall of 1971. With the existing evening program as its core, the College of Continuing Education was established, and a College of Nursing was proposed. The following fall, the Department of Business Administration was expanded and reorganized as the College of Business. These colleges, together with the College of Arts and Sciences, came to represent an organizational structure that was no longer appropriately designated by the term “college.” For that reason, among others, the school became a university in 1973. Its name was changed officially to Lewis University. As John Henry Cardinal Newman wrote, “To be perfect is to have changed often.”
In July 1975, Lewis University was accredited by the North Central Association of graduate programs (master’s and first professional degree levels). During the 1980s, Lewis University expanded its programs off-campus, establishing sites at Little Company of Mary Hospital in Evergreen Park, a graduate center in Oak Brook and sites in Schaumburg and LaSalle/Peru. Coursework also became available at sites such as St. Patrick’s High School in Chicago.
In the 1990s, the satellite campus at Little Company of Mary Hospital was moved to a new Lewis education center in Hickory Hills, and the number of off-campus sites increased

HISTORY OF LEWIS UNIVERSITY
to both meet student demand and enhance student access.
Lewis now offers more than 60 undergraduate majors in the humanities, social sciences and natural sciences, as well as in aviation, business, computer science, communications, education, fine arts and nursing. Preprofessional programs are also offered in fields such as pre-med, pre-law and pre-veterinary, among others. Graduate programs are available in business administration (MBA), counseling psychology, criminal/social justice, education, nursing, and school counseling and guidance. Accelerated graduate programs are also offered, leading to master’s degrees in organizational leadership, as well as public safety administration. Graduate programs in education offer specializations in reading and literacy, school administration, secondary certification, special education, curriculum and instruction, teaching and learning, and educational leadership, in addition to certificates of advanced study in general administrative and superintendent endorsement. A dual degree (MSN/MBA) is available at the graduate level. The postmaster’s level Certificate of Advanced Study, fulfilling Illinois state requirements for principalship and superintendent certification, is offered in education.
The Lewis University Career Education Program (LUCEP) was first established in the fall of 1990 to offer an accelerated undergraduate degree program in business administration for working adults. The degree offerings have expanded rapidly and are now delivered through the Center for Professional Education and Outreach Initiatives. Programs include bachelor’s degree completion in business administration, management, information technology management, health care leadership, and social and community studies, as well as a RN/BSN completion program.

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HISTORY OF LEWIS UNIVERSITY
In addition to a strong curriculum, Lewis provides diverse opportunities for its students through its renowned athletic program. The Flyer teams have had a history of excellence, first in the NAIA and now in the NCAA Division II. Lewis’ athletic teams have captured the Great Lakes Valley Conference All Sports trophy in 12 of the past 19 years. In 2003, Lewis won the NCAA Division I Men’s Volleyball Championship. Lewis sponsors 18 athletic teams: nine for men and nine for women, including men’s and women’s cross country, tennis, golf, volleyball, basketball, soccer, track and field, and swimming; women’s softball; and men’s baseball.
A comprehensive campus renovation program was launched in 1988 by Brother James Gaffney, FSC, University President, and the Board of Trustees, resulting in new construction, major renovations in current facilities, updating of equipment and campus beautification. Among the major achievements have been construction of the state-of-the-art Harold E. White Aviation Center; renovation of Benilde Hall which houses the College of Business and the Center for Professional Education and Outreach Initiatives; construction of the Student Recreation and Fitness Center, which includes a swimming pool, indoor track, fitness center and fieldhouse featuring four full-sized courts; and construction of North Hall, the first new residence hall on the Lewis campus in nearly three decades.
In 1999, the College of Nursing began offering an online master’s degree in nursing case management, the first online MSN case management program in the Chicagoland area.
In 2000, the School of Education achieved NCATE (National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education) accreditation. Also in 2000, the College of Nursing changed its name to the College of Nursing and Health Professions to reflect it’s planning and development efforts to

LEWIS UNIVERSITY
increase interdisciplinary programs and respond to the rapidly growing needs of the healthcare professions. In 2001, the University approved new undergraduate offerings in health care leadership, information technology management and contemporary global studies, as well as a master’s degree in public safety administration.
The School of Education became the College of Education in 2003. The fourth college for Lewis, its addition underscores the University’s continued commitment to work collaboratively with federal and state agencies, and accrediting bodies in preparing educators for the region, state and nation in response to the urgent call for quality teachers and administrators. The creation of the College of Education also is in alignment with the goals of Vision 2006: Learning, Mission and Leadership.
Vision 2006, the strategic plan for the University, calls for continued growth and expansion, with the student at the center of an interactive learning environment. Multiple opportunities exist for learners of all ages to explore connections between formal classroom instruction and learning beyond the classroom. The student-faculty ratio of 15:1 provides close, personal attention and facilitates classroom interaction.
The formation of the Scholars Academy allows eligible students in every major to enhance their educational opportunities through intensive projects arranged through contract with faculty members, as well as through conferences, immersion seminars and travel.
As its history continues to unfold, the valuescentered curriculum at Lewis provides students with the necessary foundation for ethical decision making. The University offers academic programs and learning experiences that prepare students for careers, enhance their professional capabilities, and promote personal growth and competence. Moreover, Lewis

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GENERAL INFORMATION

ACCREDITATION / ADMISSION POLICIES

provides affordable education by continuously seeking sources of grants and scholarships to supplement tuition costs.
As Lewis looks forward with anticipation to its 75th anniversary, it continues to build on its rich tradition of career preparation combined with strong liberal arts learning. New majors – including a bachelor’s degree in forensic criminal investigation and a master’s degree in information security – continue to be developed in response to community needs, career trends and an increasingly global and technological society.
A C C R E D I TAT I O N
Lewis University is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association. The College of Nursing and Health Professions’ basic professional program is approved by the State of Illinois Department of Professional Regulation, and all nursing programs, graduate and undergraduate, are fully accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (One Dupont Circle, Washington DC, 20036) for the 10-year maximum term. Department of Aviation programs are approved by the Federal Aviation Administration under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR): Approved Dispatcher Program, Approved Flight School, and Approved Aviation Maintenance Technician School. All teacher education programs are approved for entitlement by the Illinois State Board of Education in conjunction with the Illinois State Teacher Certification Board. In addition, the College of Education has earned NCATE (National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education) accreditation. Inquiries concerning regional accreditation should be directed to the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois, 60602-2504. By phone, (800) 621-7440 or (312) 263-0456. Information regarding Indiana accreditation can be found on page ii.

ADMISSION POLICIES
NON-DISCRIMINAT I O N Lewis University does not discriminate against any applicant because of race, color, religion, sexual orientation, national origin, age or disability.
REQUIREMENTS FOR APPLICANTS AS FRESHMAN STUDENTS
1) Applicants must have graduated from an approved high school with a combination of grade point average, class rank, and ACT or SAT score which indicates a strong likelihood of success in university studies.
2) Applicants must have accumulated 18 high school units. Three of those units should be in English; the remaining 15 units should be college preparatory in nature.
3) Applicants for admission must complete an Admission Application and have their high schools forward a copy of the student transcript. Students should have their ACT or SAT scores sent to the Office of Admission. Veterans must submit a DD214.
4) By Illinois state law, all incoming students born after January 1, 1957 who are taking six or more credit hours per semester must have an updated immunization record sent to the Center for Health and Counseling Services. This requirement also applies to all students receiving credit on the Romeoville campus.
ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR NURSING STUDENTS
5) First-year applicants to the nursing program are strongly advised to have completed one year of high school chemistry and two years of high school mathematics, with a grade of C or above in each class.
6) First-year applicants who plan to major in nursing need an ACT composite score of 20 or higher for admission. Applicants with a

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ADMISSION POLICIES
lower ACT composite score may select a nursing “undeclared” major and enroll in prerequisite nursing course work. Once the student has completed at least one full-time semester of prerequisite courses for the nursing major and has achieved a cumulative GPA of 2.5, the student may declare a major in nursing.
7) Successful completion of the Nursing Entrance Test.
8) Applicants must pass the Reading Comprehension and Math Skills Diagnostic Testing in order to be admitted. Advice about courses to assist students with reading and/or math skills will be provided following such testing. Admission, progression, curriculum and graduation policies of the first professional degree program in nursing are subject to change in order to comply with requirements of the current Illinois Nursing and Advanced Practice Nursing Act and Rules for Administration of Nursing and Advanced Practice Nursing Act 2000.
9) Grades in all prerequisite science courses prior to the first semester of the sophomore year must be B or higher. If students have passed their science courses with a grade of C, they may petition to demonstrate competency.
10) Every College of Nursing and Health Professions student must have completed a physical examination form and received the required immunizations (some of which are in addition to those required by Illinois law) before entering clinical courses.
11) Prior to entering clinical courses, every prelicensure College of Nursing and Health Professions student must complete a disclosure form, similar to the disclosure required by the Illinois Department of Professional Regulations in the application for licensure as an RN.
12) Every College of Nursing and Health Professions student is subject to the college’s Chemical Impairment Policy.
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LEWIS UNIVERSITY
An accelerated RN/BSN degree program is available. Nursing degree completion majors must be registered professional nurses in Illinois or must qualify for endorsement within one semester.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ENTERING TRANSFER STUDENTS A transfer student applicant (traditional programs) is defined as a degree-seeking student who has earned a minimum of 12 semester (18 quarter) hours of transferable credit at a regionally accredited post-secondary institution. Transfer student applicants need to have earned a minimum 2.0 cumulative transfer grade point average (higher for some majors) based upon all transferable courses to be considered for admission. The Office of Admission will fully review a student’s file to determine the likelihood of success at Lewis University. (Transfer students are not required to submit ACT or SAT scores or high school transcript.)
Official transcripts from all colleges/ universities attended must be sent to the Office of Admission. Students must be in good academic, disciplinary and financial standings at previous colleges/universities attended. An evaluation of transfer credit will be forwarded with the acceptance letter showing courses accepted in transfer and courses/hours that still need to be completed at Lewis.
The Office of Admission will consider applications only after the following steps have been completed:
1) An application is submitted. 2) Official transcripts are received by the
Office of Admission from each college and/or university attended. If the applicant is an admissible transfer student, an evaluation of courses and hours still needed for graduation will be forwarded by the Office of Admission.
WWW.LEWISU.EDU (800) 897-9000

GENERAL INFORMATION
REQUIREMENTS FOR ENTERING A D U LT S T U D E N T S - AT- L A R G E Undergraduate applicants 24 years of age or older are admitted to the University upon submission of a completed Application for Admission and verification of successful college attendance or high school graduation. The GED is acceptable. Degree-seeking transfer students must submit official transcripts from each college or university previously attended, may enter Lewis University as degree-seeking or non-degree students, and may pursue their studies on a part-time or full-time basis.
By Illinois state law, all incoming students born after January 1, 1957 who are taking six or more credit hours must have an updated immunization record sent to the Center for Health and Counseling Services. This requirement also applies to students receiving credit on the Romeoville campus. Every College of Nursing and Health Professions student must have a physical examination form completed before entering clinical courses.
Adults interested in attending Lewis University should contact the Office of Admission for assistance. Applications for admission and official transcripts should be sent directly to the Admission office. Students seeking admission in Lewis’ accelerated programs should contact the Center for Professional Education and Outreach Initiatives for procedures.
REQUIREMENTS FOR A D U LT S ENTERING AC C E L E R AT E D P RO G R A M S Lewis University offers undergraduate accelerated degree programs for working adults in business administration, management, health care leadership, information technology management, social and community studies, and nursing. To be admitted, students should be at least 24 years of age (or, with regard to the nursing program, a licensed registered nurse), have at least three years of full-time work experience, and have already earned at least 32 hours of college credit toward their

ADMISSION POLICIES
bachelor’s degree. (Credits may be counted for prior college coursework, military experience, training programs and approved equivalency examinations.)
To apply for admission, students should complete an Application for Admission through the Center for Professional Education and Outreach Initiatives and submit official transcripts from each college/university the student has previously attended.
Evaluation of transfer credit is based on the following criteria:
1) Credits transfer from schools accredited by the North Central Association or another regional accrediting association.
2) A maximum of four hours will transfer in physical education activity courses.
3) D grades will be accepted as transfer credit provided that the applicant has a cumulative C average and the D grades are not in courses required by the student’s major or minor.
4) A maximum of 72 semester hours of community college credits or credits from a two-year school will be accepted.
5) An unlimited number of hours will be accepted from upper division/senior institutions as long as 32 hours, including 12 hours of upper-division major courses and six hours of Mission-based courses, are completed at Lewis.
6) There are no time limits with respect to when credits were earned in order to be accepted for transfer.
7) Course grades do not transfer.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ENTERING I N T E R N AT I O N A L S T U D E N T S In addition to meeting general admission requirements, international students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language. Those international students who have attended universities abroad and where

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