Abstractbook of the 27th International HPH Conference


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Volume 9 | Supplement 1

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May | 2019

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27th International Conference on Health Promoting Hospitals & Health Services

BALANCING HIGH TECH AND HIGH TOUCH IN HEALTH CARE: CHALLENGES AND CHANCES
OF DIGITALIZATION FOR DIALOGUE

Abstract Book

p. 3 p. 3 p. 4 p. 5 p. 6 p. 12 p. 66 p. 97 p. 322

Editorial Scientific Committee Scope & Purpose Program Plenary Sessions 1-5 Oral Sessions: O1.1-04.8 Mini Oral Sessions: M1.1-2.8 E-poster Sessions Index

Warsaw, Poland
May 29-31, 2019

e Editorial Office

The Official Journal of

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Bispebjerg & Frederiksberg Hospital,

University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Table of Contents

1

Editorial ............................................................................................................................................................................................................. 3 Scientific Committee.......................................................................................................................................................................................... 3 Scope & Purpose................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4 Tuesday, May 28, 2019 ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 5 Wednesday, May 29, 2019 ................................................................................................................................................................................ 5 Thursday, May 30, 2019..................................................................................................................................................................................... 5 Friday, May 31, 2019 ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 5 Plenary 1: Impact of critical trends on public health and health care – the role of health promotion............................................................... 6 Plenary 2: Opportunities and challenges of digitalization for health care and public health ............................................................................. 7 Plenary 3: Challenges and chances for high touch interaction and communication in health care in an era of high tech................................. 8 Plenary 4: Dialogue and digitalization in health promoting primary health care and public health .................................................................. 9 Plenary 5: Ensuring high tech and high touch for all: Universal health promotion coverage........................................................................... 11 Session O1.1: Digitalization in health care and health promotion I ................................................................................................................. 12 Session O1.2: Governance and leadership for HPH I........................................................................................................................................ 13 Session O1.3: Community work ....................................................................................................................................................................... 15 Session O1.4: Health at the workplace I .......................................................................................................................................................... 17 Session O1.5: Child, adolescent and maternal health ...................................................................................................................................... 20 Session O1.6: Tobacco prevention and coping ................................................................................................................................................ 23 Session O1.7: WORKSHOP for junior researchers: Scientific writing................................................................................................................ 25 Session O1.8: WORKSHOP: Primary health care and health promotion .......................................................................................................... 25 Session O2.1: Digitalization in health care and health promotion II ................................................................................................................ 26 Session O2.2: Governance and leadership for HPH II....................................................................................................................................... 27 Session O2.3: Supportive communities............................................................................................................................................................ 30 Session O2.4: Health information and education ............................................................................................................................................ 33 Session O2.5: Weight and risk management.................................................................................................................................................... 34 Session O2.6: Tobacco prevention and coping II.............................................................................................................................................. 37 Session O2.7: SYMPOSIUM on implementing clinical health promotion ......................................................................................................... 38 Session O2.8: SYMPOSIUM: Application of integrated healthcare services in hospital settings: the HPH approach ....................................... 39 Session O3.1: Supportive practice ................................................................................................................................................................... 40 Session O3.2: Health equitiy – access to health care ....................................................................................................................................... 41 Session O3.3: Health promotion and rehabilitation ......................................................................................................................................... 43 Session O3.4: Health at the workplace ............................................................................................................................................................ 46 Session O3.5: Adolescent-friendly health care................................................................................................................................................. 48 Session O3.6: WORKSHOP on climate change and health - the role of health care professionals ................................................................... 50 Session O3.7: WORKSHOP: First coffee, then care - The Buurtzorg model ...................................................................................................... 50 Session O3.8: SYMPOSIUM: Research put into practice – do we get the expected results? ............................................................................ 51 Session O4.1: Digitalization in health care and health promotion III ............................................................................................................... 54 Session O4.2: WORKSHOP on high-tech and high-touch age-friendly health services ..................................................................................... 56 Session O4.3: Community health promotion ................................................................................................................................................... 56 Session O4.4: Health literate health care organizations .................................................................................................................................. 58 Session O4.5: Mental health support and coping ............................................................................................................................................ 61 Session O4.6: Healthy lifestyles ....................................................................................................................................................................... 61 Session O4.7: WORKSHOP: War, peace and health promotion........................................................................................................................ 64 Session O4.8: WORKSHOP of the working group "HPH and Health Literate Health Care Organizations" ........................................................ 64 Session M1.1: Health Literacy .......................................................................................................................................................................... 66 Session M1.2: Governance and leadership for HPH......................................................................................................................................... 67

Table of Contents

2

Session M1.3: Child, adolescent and maternal health ..................................................................................................................................... 69 Session M1.4: Workplace health promotion I.................................................................................................................................................. 71 Session M1.5: Mental health promotion I ....................................................................................................................................................... 73 Session M1.6: Tobacco prevention and coping................................................................................................................................................ 75 Session M1.7: Addictive behaviors – prevention and coping ........................................................................................................................... 77 Session M2.1: Digitalization in health care & health promotion ...................................................................................................................... 80 Session M2.2: Patient safety............................................................................................................................................................................ 81 Session M2.3: Community health promotion .................................................................................................................................................. 84 Session M2.4: Workplace health promotion II................................................................................................................................................. 86 Session M2.5: Mental health promotion II ...................................................................................................................................................... 88 Session M2.6: Healthy lifestyles....................................................................................................................................................................... 90 Session M2.7: Management of NCDs and chronic diseases ............................................................................................................................. 92 Session M2.8: Miscellaneous ........................................................................................................................................................................... 94 E-poster: Addictive behaviors - prevention and coping................................................................................................................................... 97 E-poster: Age-friendly care............................................................................................................................................................................ 101 E-poster: Child, adolescent and maternal health .......................................................................................................................................... 109 E-poster: Community health promotion and public health ........................................................................................................................... 119 E-poster: Digitalization in health care and health promotion ....................................................................................................................... 137 E-poster: Environment-friendly and sustainable health care ........................................................................................................................ 149 E-poster: Governance and leadership for HPH.............................................................................................................................................. 151 E-poster: Health literacy and communication ............................................................................................................................................... 153 E-poster: Health promotion and prevention in primary health services ....................................................................................................... 165 E-poster: Health promotion for older people and long-term patients .......................................................................................................... 181 E-poster: Healthy lifestyles............................................................................................................................................................................ 211 E-poster: Integrating health services and social services .............................................................................................................................. 216 E-poster: Mental health and psychiatric care................................................................................................................................................ 221 E-poster: Migration, equity and diversity in health care and health promotion ........................................................................................... 233 E-poster: Monitoring quality, patient safety and health promotion objectives ............................................................................................ 235 E-poster: Patient an community empowerment and involvement, self-help friendly hospitals ................................................................... 276 E-poster: Prevention of NCDs and chronic disease management ................................................................................................................. 280 E-poster: Tobacco prevention and coping..................................................................................................................................................... 288 E-poster: Workplace health promotion in health care organizations............................................................................................................ 294 Index .............................................................................................................................................................................................................. 322

Editorial, Scientific Committee, Scope & Purpose

3

Editorial
Dear participants of the 27th International Conference on Health Promoting Hospitals and Health Services, dear readers of Clinical Health Promotion!
This year, the annual International Conference on Health Promoting Hospitals and Health Services in Warsaw, Poland, is kindly hosted by the HPH Network Poland. This network was founded in 1993 and hosted the 1st International Conference of HPH in the same year also in Warsaw. It was re-founded in 2011. Now, it has 18 members and is coordinated by the Department of Public Health, Health Sciences Faculty at Warsaw Medical University. It has provided valuable support to the international HPH network, the coordinator Bożena WalewkskaZielecka also served as chair of the HPH Governance Board from 2016-18.
The local host, together with the scientific committee, has decided that the focus of the 27th International HPH Conference will be on " Balancing high tech and high touch in health care: Challenges and chances of digitalization for dialogue". The conference topic responds to the most important tends of the first decades of the 21st century. What will be the intended and unintended consequences of digitalization and other relevant developments in health services on health promotion and public health in health care? How to ensure maintaining and increasing opportunities for health promotion under the emerging conditions will be one of the guiding questions.
The conference program starts with a look at various trends and their impacts on health care, public health and health promotion in the opening plenary. We will go more into detail in the plenaries investigating how digitalization affects health promotion, empowerment and involvement - the second plenary session will identify and analyze some of the most relevant opportunities and challenges arising from digitalization for health promotion in the context of health care and public health, the third plenary session will discuss challenges and chances of high tech, e.g. for co-production of health, shared decision making, empowerment and involvement of patients and relatives. Finally, we will highlight strategic and policy aspects resulting from the relevant trends - the fourth plenary session will therefore focus on new tasks, roles, co-operations and organizational forms in primary health and public health services and the fifth plenary session, discusses perspectives for necessary investments in health promotion and for universal health (promotion) services coverage.
Altogether, 11 plenary lectures by renowned international experts will address these themes during the two and a half days of the conference. In addition to these five plenaries, the conference will offer a rich parallel program including oral presentations and workshops, mini oral presentations and posters. Overall, the Scientific Committee screened over 900 abstracts, which were submitted from around the world. Out of these, 731 abstracts (80 %) were finally accepted for presentation in 32 oral sessions and workshops (132 abstracts), 15 mini oral sessions (73 abstracts), and an electronic poster session (526 abstracts).
Delegates from all over the world will meet at the conference to present, discuss, and network around topics related to HPH. Similar to previous years, the abstract book of the 27th International HPH Conference is published as a supplement to the official journal of the international HPH network, Clinical Health Promotion – Research & Best Practice for patients, staff and community. This will ensure high visibility and recognition for

the conference contributions of the delegates. Furthermore, attention will be increased through the publication of the Virtual Proceedings after the event. Presenters should be prepared to upload their presentations and posters as soon as possible after the conference to www.hphconferences.org/warsaw2019. Now, we would like to thank all those who contributed to the program development and to the production of this abstract book. Our special thanks go to the plenary speakers, all abstract submitters, the members of the Scientific Committee, in particular for the review of numerous abstracts, the chairs of the plenary and parallel sessions, the Editorial Office at the WHO Collaborating Centre for Evidence-based Health Promotion in Copenhagen, and above all the local host of this 27th International HPH Conference in Warsaw.
Jürgen M. Pelikan & Rainer Christ
Competence Centre for Health Promotion in Hospitals and Health Care at Gesundheit Österreich GmbH (Austrian Public Health Institute)
Scientific Committee
Cristina AGUZZOLI, HPH regional Network Italy-Friuli Venezia Giulia | Isabelle AUJOULAT, International Union for Health Promotion and Education | Antonio CHIARENZA, Member of the HPH Governance Board, HPH regional Network Italy-Emilia Romagna, HPH Task Force Migration, Equity and Diversity | Shu-Ti CHIOU, HPH Task Force Age-Friendly Health care | Rainer CHRIST, Coordinator of the Scientific Committee, Competence Centre for Health Promotion in Hospitals and Health Services | Aleksandra CZERW, Medical University Warsaw | Eric DE ROODENBEKE, International Hospital Federation | Andrzej DEPTALA, Vice-Rector of Medical University of Warsaw, Memebr of Scientific Board of Health Sciences Faculty; Head of Department of Oncological Prophylaxis at Health Sciences Faculty | Christina DIETSCHER, Austrian Ministry of Health | Jerneja FARKAS-LAINSCAK, HPH Network Slovenia | Sally FAWKES, Vice-Chair of the HPH Governance Board, regional HPH Network Victoria | Kjersti FLOTTEN, HPH Network Norway | Giulio FORNERO, HPH regional Network Italy-Piedmont | Susan B. FRAMPTON, HPH regional Network Connecticut, USA | Mitsuhiko FUNAKOSHI, HPH Network Japan | Pascal GAREL, European Hospital and Healthcare Federation | Joanna GOTLIB, Vice Dean at Health Sciences Faculty, the head of the department of Didactics and Effects of Learning at Health Sciences Faculty | Miriam GUNNING, Chair, Global Network for Tobacco Free Health Care Services | Heli HÄTÖNEN, Member of the HPH Governance Board (tbc at next GA), HPH Network Finland | Cristina INIESTA BLASCO, Member of the HPH Governance Board, HPH regional Network Catalonia | Thor Bern JENSEN, HPH Secretariat Copenhagen | Grzegorz JUSZCZYK, Director General, National Institute of Public Health– National Institute of Hygiene, Poland | Dolors JUVINYA, HPH regional Network Catalonia | Margareta KRISTENSON, Chair of the HPH Governance Board, HPH Network Sweden | Ming-Nan LIN, Task Force HPH & Environment | Piotr MAŁKOWSKI, Dean of Health Sciences Faculty, Medical University of Warsaw | Birgit METZLER, Competence Centre for Health Promotion in Hospitals and Health Services | Peter NOWAK, Competence Centre for Health Promotion in Hospitals and Health Services | Jürgen PELIKAN, Chair of the Scientific Committee, Head of the Competence Centre for Health Promotion in Hospitals and Health Services | Kaja POLLUSTE, HPH Network Estonia | Lise-Lotte RISÖ BERGERLIND, HPH Task Force on Mental health | Manel SANTIÑÀ, HPH Task Force on Standards for Health Promotion | Ilaria SIMONELLI, HPH Task Force Health Promotion with Children & Adolescents | Alan SIU, Member of the HPH Governance Board,

Editorial, Scientific Committee, Scope & Purpose

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HPH regional Network Hong Kong | Jeff Kirk SVANE, HPH Secretariat Copenhagen | Simone TASSO, HPH regional Network ItalyVeneto | Hanne TØNNESEN, CEO of the HPH Secretariat Copenhagen | Bożena WALEWSKA-ZIELECKA, Department of Public Health, Health Sciences Faculty, National Coordinator of Polish HPH Network | Ying-Wei WANG, Member of the HPH Governance Board, HPH regional Network Taiwan | Raffaele ZORATTI, Former Chair of the HPH Governance Board
Scope & Purpose
High tech and high touch – are these competing or even contradictory issues or reconcilable principles for the future of health care and health promotion? The titles of two scientific articles, “Disruptive Innovation – Low Touch” and “Getting High-Tech to Remain High-Touch ”, phrase two extreme perspectives on these issues. However, viewpoints, positions and arguments are continuously challenged by rapid technological and social developments - it is probably not that simple!
There is a lot of discourse on the effects of ongoing digitalization on health care, but to find out which opportunities and challenges result for health promotion in health care, is an even more complex endeavor.
This conference intends to address these questions from a variety of perspectives. Technological development and digitalization are just parts of global megatrends, which affect societies in general, and by that also population health and health care. The first plenary session will start by analyzing which critical trends impact health care and public health, as well as health promotion in health services.
Digitalization has already changed our everyday lives considerably and will continue to do so. These changes affect society as a whole, but also specific areas such as public health and health care, each in its own way. In the light of these developments, the second plenary session will identify and analyze some of the most relevant opportunities and challenges arising from digitalization for health promotion in the context of health care and public health.
Opportunities and challenges arising from technological development for health care and life style interventions are emerging rapidly. But how does this development impact high touch interaction and communication in health care and health promotion? Taking up this question, the third plenary session will discuss challenges and chances of high tech, e.g. for co-production of health, shared decision making, empowerment and involvement of patients and relatives.
The conference will deal not only with the drivers coming from technology, but also with trends and changes in health care systems and public health itself. Strengthening primary health and public health services has been defined by WHO as issues of high priority. The fourth plenary session will therefore focus on new tasks, roles, co-operations and organizational forms in primary health and public health services.
Finally, in the fifth plenary session, perspectives for investments in health promotion and for universal health (promotion) services coverage will be discussed from the viewpoints of different stakeholders - politics, professionals, patients and industry – considering the trends addressed throughout the conference.

Program
Tuesday, May 28, 2019
08:00-14:30 HPH Summer School
15:00-17:30 HPH Newcomers workshop
Wednesday, May 29, 2019
09:00-16:00 GLOBAL NETWORK Tobacco-free conference / GOLD Forum Tobacco-free Health Services deliver quality care – sharing the experience
17:00-17:30 Conference Opening
17:30-19:00 Opening Plenary: Impact of critical trends on public health and health care – the role of health promotion
19:00-21:00 Welcome Reception
Thursday, May 30, 2019
09:00-10:30 Plenary 2: Opportunities and challenges of digitalization for health care and public health
09:00-17:45 Electronic Poster Session
10:30-11:00 Coffee, tea refreshments
11:00-12:30 Oral parallel sessions 1
12:30-13:30 Lunch
13:30-14:15 Mini oral sessions 1
14:15-15:45 Oral parallel sessions 2
15:45-16:00 Coffee, tea, refreshments
16:15-17:45 Plenary 3: Challenges and chances for high touch interaction and communication in health care in an era of high tech
20:00-22:00 Conference dinner

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Friday, May 31, 2019
09:00-10:30 Plenary 4: Dialogue and digitalization in health promoting primary health care and public health
10:30-11:00 Coffee, tea, refreshments
11:00-12:30 Oral parallel sessions 3
12:30-13:30 Lunch
13:30-14:15 Mini oral parallel sessions 2
14:15-15:45 Oral parallel sessions 4
15:45-16:00 Coffee, tea, refreshments
16:00-17:30 Plenary 5: Ensuring high tech and high touch for all: Universal health promotion coverage
17:30-17:45 Conference closing
17:45-18:30 Farewell refreshments

Opening Plenary: Wednesday, May 29, 2019, 17:30-19:00

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Plenary 1: Impact of critical
trends on public health and health care – the role of health
promotion
Critical trends impacting health care
and public health
DE ROODENBEKE Eric
There are many publications on future of health, and they cover same aspects although coming from different perspectives and giving different emphasis to some or the other trend. Rather than going through a shopping list it is better to articulate theses factors in categories to better reflect on them and figure out what changes should be made in health service delivery and public health interventions to enhance health of the population. Demand for health services is changing because of demography, epidemiology, climate but also people expectations and the technology revolution. The ageing population as well as the urbanization are creating new conditions for health services including a different approach of care as well as health support breaking silos from the medical field to a broader social response. The health status is also changing with the recognition of the importance of multimorbidity than cannot be addressed as previously through a combined specialty approach and a stronger need to have a health mediator for navigating in the health system. Climate change is already affecting all continents with more and more violent and unexpected natural disasters, but longerterm impact will have major consequences on health and population. People expectations and technologies play together for more empowerment and a drastic change in the providers/patient relation as well as for the expected responsibilities of individuals and the role of the community. Moving toward coproduction of healthcare is much more than a shift in words. For all the demand factors the key question is around how deep our actual knowledge of these trends is, and what is the variation regarding local conditions. The supply of health services is also fast evolving because of scientific breakthrough, new technologies and change in the scope of work of Health professionals as a result of the two first trends. Among the scientific breakthrough the genomics driving care towards predictive medicine and individualized treatments is opening the door for a paradigm shift that is still at a very early stage. New technologies including nanotechnologies, robotics and of course the multiple variations of eheath applications are offering a very large spectrum of possible responses to the current challenges for improving health of the population. The combination of these two is drastically affecting the role of health professionals putting at stake the education models and the responsibility between professions. The evolution of Electronic Health records with Artificial Intelligence will be changing drastically the intervention of health professionals and the organization of service providers. For all supply factors the major uncertainty is on technology adoption and capacity to drive change for general interest instead of fighting for own entitlement. The market forces make the third component on trends of evolution. The critical factors affecting the market forces will be around the resource allocation mechanisms, the level of globalization of the market and increased uncertainty. Resource allocation is not around public health versus healthcare but on how much societies are ready to spend on health versus

other expenses and how will it be possible to spend more effectively on health. Globalization is at early stage but is a game changer as it makes health issue more and more international while the global governance is not yet prepared for this. Globalization has also increasing impact on health with migration and booming travel. New disruptive players may also create unexpected big bang in service delivery. Finally, increased uncertainty is also playing a major role in the way organizations are considering their role and respond to the need of population.For market forces the key element is in the hand of policy makers that have the responsibility to shape up the framework in which health service are evolving.
Contact: DE ROODENBEKE Eric CEO, International Hospital Federation [email protected]

Plenary 2: Thursday, May 30, 2019, 09:00-10:30

7

Plenary 2: Opportunities and
challenges of digitalization for
health care and public health
The value of effective clinical data interchange among Healthcare Organizations. 13 years of experience in Catalonia
PASTOR Xavier
Patient centered care requires a close collaboration among different healthcare organizations (HCO). In 2006 a task force group was committed by Public Health authorities of Catalonia for a radical redesign of the healthcare in a broad district of Barcelona with a population on 600.000 inhabitants. The focus was the improvement in the relationship between Primary care (PC) and Specialized Care (SC) for a better integrated process of healthcare for the population. Twenty-three centers were involved. They belong to nine different Healthcare organizations: three hospitals, one SC outpatient clinic and six PC organizations. Initial analysis resulted in a high heterogeneity in the degree of technological investment, development and maturity in the use of EPRs by the professionals. An interchange platform was developed using structured xml files with clinical content based on standard HL7 v2.5 messages. After 12 years of real experience in the use of such project several scores demonstrated the benefits in terms of quality of care of the population. The other big achievement has been the standardization of the clinical processes in this area. Such results stimulated and promoted the expansion of the model. Nowadays, the interoperability platform, named IS3, connects nearly all the Catalonian public HCO and allows new relationships like the connection among community and reference hospitals to improve the quality and efficiency of the tertiary care. The Regional Health Information System (RHIS) is complemented with a central repository of clinical documentation. A good governance model of the different ICT departments involved, based upon professionalism, leadership and transparency, are key points for the achievement of the initial goals. However, new challenges are over the horizon. Some of them are related to the integration of more health services like Emergencies, Mental Health, Home care and Social Services. Others, like the online shared management of the Health Problems list of the patient are or care plans are more challenging because they require institutional agreements and interprofessional collaboration among healthcare stakeholders.
Contact: PASTOR Xavier Prof. Xavier Pastor, MD, PhD CMIO and Regular Professor, Medical Faculty. University of Barcelona, Medical Informatics Dep. Hospital Clínic [email protected]

Digital solutions for mental health
promotion and treatment: examples
of good practice and brilliant failures
RIPER Heleen
Over the last two decades the digital landscape of mental health care research and service innovation has gained momentum. This period is characterized by many success stories but brilliant failures as well. Today, e-mental health is like a two-headed Janus. One side of his face illustrates the birth of innovative technologies that entered mental health services and research practices. In parallel, the evidence-base for the application of these new technologies, such as internet-based treatments for depression, has been established with effect sizes comparable to those of face-to-face treatments. The other side of his face shows, however, that e-mental health has not yet lived up to its full potential as its actual delivery, evaluation and implementation in routine care has proven to be a much longer and bumpier road than expected. The question addressed in this presentation will be 'what does the future hold'? Acknowledging that futures are difficult to predict Riper nevertheless provides insights on how we may overcome some of these bumps and how we may create a future that serves our needs. Riper will argue that a new paradigm for mental health care is required in which a research by design approach is adopted that integrates scientific methods for the development of innovative health care innovation ('co-creation'), with evaluation ('beyond RCT's only') and implementation ('evidence-based implementation strategies') of these interventions in routine care settings as well. She will illustrate this new paradigm by virtue of the results of a number of innovative research projects that are indicative for this research by design approach such as the H2020 European Comparative Effectiveness Research on Internet-based Depression Treatment.
Contact: RIPER Heleen Full Professor eMental-Health/ clinical psychology, Chair DIFFER: Digital Framework for E-Health Research, President PAST International Society for Research on Internet Interventions (ISRII) VU University Amsterdam [email protected]

Plenary 3: Thursday, May 30, 2019, 16:15-17:45

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Plenary 3: Challenges and chances for high touch interaction and communication in health care in an era of high tech
High tech digital health solutions enabling high touch relationships
GANN Bob
"At its best, technology supports and improves human life; at its worst, it alienates, distorts and destroys" (John Naisbitt, High Tech, High Touch: Technology and Our Search for Meaning). The futureologist, John Naisbitt, laid down his challenge as long ago as 1999, in the early days of the internet. Even he could not have foreseen the enormous advances in digital health: millions of health websites, hundreds of thousands of health apps, personalised self management, virtual consultations, wearable technology, big data analytics, genomics, artificial intelligence. There is a common perception that increased use of technology furthers human disconnection. On the contrary, at its best, technology can facilitate communication, reduce isolation, build relationships, and promote lifestyles which are healthy and engaged. The presentation will illustrate how health organisations, particularly in the UK, are working with patients and consumers to ensure digital technologies support, rather than replace, high touch human relationships. Digital technologies are enabling personal interactions with clinicians, freeing us from the constraints of the physical world (including the time, cost and stress of travel) through video consultations. Digital self management and lifestyle plans are personalised and relevant to individual concerns and preferences, rather than impersonal “one-size-fits-all” approaches. Intergenerational befriending schemes are connecting schoolchildren and older people in care homes, where the children introduce the older people to digital devices and how to use them. Virtual reality headsets are allowing people who would otherwise be withdrawn and isolated to experience a world outside the confines of their care environment. Rather than meaning people become inactive, digital technologies can be a powerful way of motivating people to get mobile. People are using wearable fitness monitors to motivate physical activity, often sharing experiences with others in communities. Loneliness and isolation is a major public health challenge, with a health impact equivalent to living with a long term condition or smoking 15 cigarettes a day. People who would otherwise be lonely and isolated are being supported to get online so that they can keep in touch with friends and family – technology enabling rather than replacing human contact.
Contact: GANN Bob Digital Inclusion Specialist, NHS Digital [email protected] | @Bob_Gann
Shared-decision making in the context of new information technologies
ELWYN Glyn

New information technologies are changing the relationship between users and those who deliver services to users. Platforms such as Uber and Lyft change the way we use vehicles, time and space. Airbnb has changed how we travel. Wikipedia changes how we learn and keep up to date. But in healthcare, change seems slower. Yet there are indications that technology will soon transform the relationship between people and healthcare delivery services: it will lead to coproduction as the only feasible way to practice medicine. How? By providing people with easy-to-access trustworthy informationBy enabling healthcare professionals to see useful personal profiles of their clients in real time at any workstationBy making a digital version of the clinical encounter available to people who need to have it - at any timeBy analyzing the content of clinical encounters - for the correct evidence, for communication skills - and making use of this information to improve practiceBy connecting people with illness to the right peer network of others who have more experience and knowledgeBy making sure knowledge gaps are identified, shared and solved by facilitated networks Some clinicians embrace this vision. Indeed, they are frustrated that current electronic records stand in the way of being able to do this new work. Others worry that this is a vision of hell. For sure, there is no doubt that the interface between the internet, information technology, and healthcare is problematic, and needs solutions.
Contact: ELWYN Glyn The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, USA [email protected]
Health promoting person-centred care over the whole care chain
EKMAN Inger
Background: The focus of person-centredness in health care is that a patient is a person with capabilities and needs. Personcentred care involves a partnership between the health care professional and the patient (often with relatives) and contain the following interrelated parts: Initiating the partnership – the patient narrative, the patient’s experience, resources and needs can be identified in the narrative, and forms the basis for the continued planning, together with relevant examinations and tests.Working the partnership – the personal health plan is co¬created by the patient and the health professionals. Safeguarding the partnership - documenting the agreed goals and the personal health-plan Based in this operationalizing of person-centred care, Centre for Person-Centred Care at University of Gothenburg (GPCC) has performed more than 20 controlled studies evaluating the effect of PCC, most of them showing positive results. In this presentation examples of randomized controlled studies evaluating person-centred health promotion over the whole care chain and over distance (tele-care) will be presented. The intervention in the respective study will be presented in detail and some of the results were Return to previous activity (e.g work)Increased self-efficacySustainable effects 2 yearsSignificantly better effect in low-educated patients
Contact: EKMAN Inger Professor, centre director, chair COST CARES, Gothenburg University, Centre for Person-centred Care (GPCC), Sweden [email protected]

Plenary 4: Friday, May 31, 2019, 09:00-10:30

9

Plenary 4: Dialogue and digitali-
zation in health promoting pri-
mary health care and public
health
New forms of medical care in the
community
WANG Ying-Wei
Development of smart technology has brought about fundamental changes to the health care system. With advanced technology and a robust public health system, Taiwan’s health care model for the community has also diversified with introduction of various smart innovations. In this session, the novel development of Taiwan’s primary health care system in the era of smart technology will be illustrated with examples on integration of community health resources, disease screening and prevention of noncommunicable diseasesThe primary healthcare system of Taiwan aims for better utilization of long-term care resources, by integrating resources to improve service capacity, linking communities to share health resources, efficiently integrating and managing health resources across sectors, and improve service quality through single points of service. For disease screening, Health Promotion Administration (HPA) offers screening services that are cost-effective for health benefits, early detection and treatment of diseases. In the era of Industry 4.0, Internet of Things and Big Data, data is now regarded as indispensable resources. Years of data accumulated from physical examinations, screening and adult preventive health services has put Taiwan in the best position to develop personalized, precision health care service. HPA is also planning on evidence-based adjustment to refine adult preventive health services. From personal to household data, HPA plans to map out the complete community health resources, and create a win-win situation for both the service users and providers to benefit from the data.Taking diabetes as an example, Taiwan has been promoting the Diabetes Mellitus Shared Care Network, combining data from screening, medical visits and complications into digitized, personalized data vehicles, enabling cloud-based record of data such as blood glucose levels, dietary and exercise habits. Contrary to the conventional consultation, health educators can now examine the patient’s information in real-time and provide immediate care services. Patient can also improve their own self-health management through the likes of remotes services and robotic care. We are already adopting smart technology such as wearable devices and chronic disease risk prediction to integrate health information, and using these data to further improve and perfect the “peoplecentered healthcare”.
Contact: WANG Ying-Wei Hualien Tzuchi General Hospital 970 Sec 3 Chung Yang Rd Hualien, [email protected]

Self-organization and new organizations for health promotion and longterm care in the community
DE LEEDE Mirjam
Buurtzorg is a pioneering healthcare organization established 12 years ago with a nurse-led model of holistic care that has revolutionized community care in the Netherlands. Client satisfaction rates are the highest of any healthcare organization. Staff commitment and contentedness is reflected in Buurtzorg’s title of Best Employer (4 out of the last 5 years). And impressive financial savings have been made. Ernst & Young documented savings of around 40 percent to the Dutch health care system. Buurtzorg scaled very quickly across the Netherlands from 1 to 960 teams in 12 years. During this time Buurtzorg grew in other areas of care such as mental health, children and families and also supported other Dutch international care organizations to take on the Buurtzorg model of care. Collaboration is key to Buurtzorg’s model of care and its operating model, resulting in Buurtzorg collaborating to find new ways of working and new areas of care, at home and internationally. As the model develops a global learning network is forming around Buurtzorg to share experience and knowledge. Buurtzorg’s model of care promotes self-management from both clients and nursing teams. Principles such as continuity, building trusting relationships and building networks in the neighbourhood are all important and logical for the teams. A team of 12 nurses are working together. More about the Buurtzorg model, self-managing clients and self- managing teams will be worked out during the presentation.
Contact: DE LEEDE Mirjam Buurtzorg Nederland, team Veenendaal NW [email protected]
Early childhood interventions – cooperation, networking and dialogue to support families in need
HAAS Sabine
Regional networks to support families in need in early childhood are the core element of the Austrian model for early childhood intervention. The networks build on the available services of a region and reach out to families actively and systematically by sensitizing potential referrers. Over a longer period of time, family supporters assist the families mainly in the form of home visits and organize the necessary support services. Thus, cooperation, networking and dialogue with families as well as network partners are central. Since 2015, regional early childhood intervention networks have been set up or expanded in all Austrian provinces according to the uniform model. At the end of 2018, 63 of the 116 political districts in Austria were covered by regional networks. The implementation is supported by the National Centre for Early Childhood Interventions, which promotes and supports nationwide coordination and networking, quality assurance of implementation as well as knowledge transfer and public relations work. Early Childhood Interventions are already anchored in numerous political strategies. Currently, there is an important focus on work towards sustainable and nationwide establishment. The documentation shows a rapid increase in the number

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Abstractbook of the 27th International HPH Conference