Coffee Talk Book Club: Redesigning America’s Community


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Spring 2018 Professional Development Book Club
Coffee Talk Book Club:
Redesigning
America’s
Community
Colleges with
Guided Pathways
“Research on organizational effectiveness in and outside of higher education indicates that, in contrast to the disconnection and isolation that characterize the cafeteria college structure, high-performing organizations implement their “core
functions” in a coordinated, complementary fashion that is aligned with organizational goals. The offerings and support services provided by community colleges under the prevailing model are well designed to achieve the organizational goal of access to college courses. They are not well designed to help students enter and complete college programs that prepare them for further education and employment. From this perspective, it would appear that Achieving the Dream and other similar reforms have been too limited in their goals. To support student
success, it is not enough to try to find ways to improve student completion in courses as they are currently designed; rather, courses need to be incorporated into larger program redesigns. The guided pathways approach to redesign starts with students’ end goals in mind, and then rethinks and redesigns programs and
support services to enable students to achieve these goals.”
Faculty and Staff will receive a FREE copy of the book!
We hope you will choose to read this book and take part in our Coffee Talk Workshops or our online discussions!
www2.palomar.edu/pages/pd

Workshop Series: Redesigning Palomar with Guided Pathways

Register for these workshops in the 3PD Portal. If you cannot attend the face-to-face workshops you can join in on the conversation online in our Connect discussion in the 3PD Portal.

Date
1/25/17 (plenary)

Day

Time

Title

Facilitator

Thursday

10-10:50am

Book Club Kick Off! Come to this workshop to pick up your book and let’s discuss what we will be learning throughout the book club. What are guided pathways? What changes could we make at Palomar to help our students be more successful?

Kelly Falcone & Olga Diaz

Room MD-203

2/8/17

Thursday 8-9 am

2/22/17 3/8/17

Thursday 8-9 am Thursday 8-9 am

3/22/17

Thursday 8-9 am

4/5/17 4/19/17

Thursday 8-9 am Thursday 8-9 am

5/3/17

Thursday 8-9 am

Book Club Coffee Talk: Chapter 1 Redesigning College Programs
Book Club Coffee Talk: Chapter 2 Guiding Students
Book Club Coffee Talk: Chapter 3 Rethinking Student Instruction
Book Club Coffee Talk: Chapter 4 Helping Underprepared Students
Book Club Coffee Talk: Chapter 5 Engaging Faculty and Staff
Book Club Coffee Talk: Chapter 6 The Economics of College Redesign
Book Club Coffee Talk: Conclusion

Kelly Falcone & Olga Diaz
Kelly Falcone & Olga Diaz
Kelly Falcone & Olga Diaz
Kelly Falcone & Olga Diaz
Kelly Falcone & Olga Diaz
Kelly Falcone & Olga Diaz
Kelly Falcone & Olga Diaz

MD-103 MD-103 MD-103 MD-103 MD-103 MD-103 MD-103

www2.palomar.edu/pages/pd

Book Club in Committees/Councils/Meetings
To help create a college-wide discussion we encourage committees/councils to follow along with the book club and discuss how the information in each chapter relates to the work that is being done in shared governance. Below are suggested dates to include an item on the agenda for a discussion. This list only includes a few committees/councils, but hopefully more will embrace the topic and promote a dialogue!

Topic

Committee/Council meeting date

Chapter 1 Redesigning College Programs

Faculty senate: 2/12 Instructional Planning Council: 2/14 Strategic Planning Council: 2/6 Student Services Planning Council: 2/14

Chapter 2 Guiding Students

Faculty senate:2/26 Instructional Planning Council: 2/28 Strategic Planning Council: 2/20 Student Services Planning Council: 2/28

Chapter 3 Rethinking Student Instruction

Faculty senate: 3/12 Instructional Planning Council: 3/14 Strategic Planning Council: 3/6 Student Services Planning Council: 3/14

Chapter 4 Helping Underprepared Students

Faculty senate: 4/2 Instructional Planning Council: 4/11 Strategic Planning Council: 3/20 Student Services Planning Council: 4/11

Chapter 5 Engaging Faculty and Staff

Faculty senate:4/9 Instructional Planning Council: 4/11 Strategic Planning Council: 4/3 Student Services Planning Council: 4/11

Chapter 6 The Economics of College Redesign

Faculty senate: 4/23 Instructional Planning Council: 4/25 Strategic Planning Council: 4/17 Student Services Planning Council: 4/25

Conclusion

Faculty senate: 5/7 Instructional Planning Council: 5/9 Strategic Planning Council: 5/1 Student Services Planning Council: 4/25

Human Resources Planning Council: 2/8 Finance and Administrative Services Planning Council: 2/8 Professional Development Committee: 2/13 Curriculum Committee: 2/7
Human Resources Planning Council: 2/22 Finance and Administrative Services Planning Council: 2/22 Professional Development Committee: 2/27 Curriculum Committee: 2/21
Human Resources Planning Council: 3/8 Finance and Administrative Services Planning Council: 3/8 Professional Development Committee: 3/13 Curriculum Committee: 3/7
Human Resources Planning Council: 3/22 Finance and Administrative Services Planning Council: 3/22 Professional Development Committee: 4/10 Curriculum Committee: 3/21
Human Resources Planning Council: 4/5 Finance and Administrative Services Planning Council: 4/5 Professional Development Committee: 4/10 Curriculum Committee: 4/4
Human Resources Planning Council: 4/19 Finance and Administrative Services Planning Council: 4/19 Professional Development Committee: 4/24 Curriculum Committee: 4/18
Human Resources Planning Council: 5/3 Finance and Administrative Services Planning Council: 5/3 Professional Development Committee: 3/4 Curriculum Committee: 5/2

www2.palomar.edu/pages/pd

Book Club Online!
Log-in to the 3PD Portal. Go to Connect, then select “All Communities” Choose “Palomar Book Club.”
www2.palomar.edu/pages/pd

Chapter 1: Redesigning College Programs

Chapter Outline
● Choice Architecture and Student Behavior ● Students Lost in a Maze ● No Clear Path to a Bachelor’s Degree
■ Credits Don’t Transfer ■ Poor Alignment Between Two- and Four-Year Programs ■ The Perplexing Transfer Process ■ Curricular Incoherence Limits Learning ● The Guided Pathways Model ■ Guiding Student Choices Without Restricting Options ■ Aligning Program Learning Outcomes with Students Goals ● Guided Pathways in Practice ■ Mapping Clearer Paths
■ Queensborough Community College ■ Miami Dade College ■ Florida State University ■ Bridging the Transfer Divide ■ Arizona State University MAPPS ■ Guttman Community College ■ The City University of New York ● A Framework for Rethinking Other College Practices

Questions
How do Palomar College policies/processes/practices help students make informed/clear choices?(pg. 23-25, 34-38)

Your Responses

How do Palomar College policies/processes/practices help students avoid credit loss and taking unnecessary courses? (pg. 26-30)
How do Palomar College program designs help students understand the learning goals and sense of progress? (pg. 38-39)
To close equity gaps and increase student success and persistence, what might Palomar College consider either continuing, stopping, changing, or starting?

Chapter 2: Guiding Students

Chapter Outline
● New Student Intake in the Cafeteria College ○ Linkages with Feeders ○ Orientation and Registration
● Services to Get and Keep Students on Track ○ In-Person Academic Advising ○ Online Advising and Tracking Resources ○ Student Success Courses
● Redesigning Student Supports ○ Strengthening Student Success Courses ○ Leveraging E-Advising Systems ■ Integrating Supports Along the Path ■ Providing “Just In Time” Feedback ■ The Role of College Organization and Culture
● Examples In Practice

Questions

Your Responses

How do Palomar College policies/processes/practices in support services assist incoming students in choosing an appropriate program of study? (pg. 56-63, 68-69)

How do Palomar College policies/processes/practices in support services teach students how to use available resources? (pg. 63-67, 69-70)

How do Palomar College policies/processes/practices in support services track students progress and provide timely interventions? (pg. 61-64, 70-73)

To close equity gaps and increase student success and persistence, what might Palomar College consider either continuing, stopping, changing, or starting?

Chapter 3: Rethinking Student Instruction

Chapter Outline
● Academic Challenges Facing Students ○ Procedural and Conceptual Learning ○ Metacognitive Skills
● How the Cafeteria College Addresses these Challenges ○ Knowledge Transmission: The Dominant Model ○ How the Cafeteria College Supports the Knowledge Transmission Model ■ Hiring and Promotion ■ Professional Development ○ Other Attempts to Address Academic Challenges ■ Academic Support Services ■ Flexible Online Learning Options ■ Online Learning: Not Systematic Support Strategy
● Instruction in the Guided Pathways College ○ Emphasize Skills, Concepts, and Habits of Mind ■ Concepts Versus Content ■ Who Should Create Program Maps? ○ Collaborate with Students Services Professionals ■ Including Librarians in Course Design ■ Including Student Services Professional in Instructional Teams ○ Peer-Based Professional Development ■ Faculty Inquiry ■ Barriers to Inquiry- and How Peer-Based Structures Can Address Them ■ Examples of Collaborative Inquiry ■ Leverage Technology … Wisely ■ Using Technology to Support Inductive Teaching ■ Using Technology to Provide Personalized Feedback

Questions
How do Palomar College policies/processes/practices support faculty in identifying and implementing pedagogical choices (knowledge transmission/learning facilitation)? (pg. 84-90)
How do Palomar College policies/processes/practices support faculty mapping and re-designing curriculum? (pg. 97-104)
How do Palomar College policies/processes/practices support faculty with an embedded time/space for a process of inquiry and faculty/counselor collaboration? (pg. 107-112)
To close equity gaps and increase student success and persistence, what might Palomar College consider either continuing, stopping, changing, or starting?

Your Responses

Chapter 4: Helping Underprepared Students
Chapter Outline
○ The Development Diversion ■ Developmental Assessment ■ Developmental Instruction
○ Rethinking Developmental Education as an “On-Ramp” to Programs of Study ■ Customizing Assessment and Placement ■ Accelerating Developmental Curricula ■ Integrating Academic Support into Program of Study ■ Engaging Students through Improved Instruction
○ Connecting to College Learning in High School ■ Transition Curricula ■ Dual Enrollment and “Early College” High School

Questions
How do Palomar College policies/processes/practices support student’s ability to place in the correct English/Math course? (pg. 123-132)
How do Palomar College policies/processes/practices support faculty collaboration and creation of basic skill pathways? (pg. 132-139)
How do Palomar College policies/processes/practices support faculty partnerships with K-12? (pg. 139 - 142)
To close equity gaps and increase student success and persistence, what might Palomar College consider either continuing, stopping, changing, or starting?

Your Responses

Chapter 5: Engaging Faculty and Staff
Chapter Outline
○ Governance ■ Relational Trust ■ Demonstrate Integrity ■ Showing Respect for Others ■ Structures That Focus on Practice, Not Politics ■ Engaging Existing Faculty and Staff Groups ■ Creating Cross-Functional Teams
○ Professional Development ■ Critical Areas of Development ■ Time and Resources ■ The Long-Term Payoff in Time and Enthusiasm ■ Repurposing Time and Resources
○ Hiring, Promotion, and Recognition ■ Collaboration and Inquiry ■ Roles of Adjunct Faculty and Staff

Questions
How does the Palomar College resource request process encourage funding “long term solutions’ or “short term justification”? (pg. 148-149)
How do Palomar College policies/processes/practices support the time and resources necessary for long-term cross-functional teams? (pg. 151-157, 162-165)
How do Palomar College policies/processes/practices support the time and resources necessary for adjunct faculty participation? (pg. 168-170)
To close equity gaps and increase student success and persistence, what might Palomar College consider either continuing, stopping, changing, or starting?

Your Responses

Chapter 6: The Economics of College Redesign
Chapter Outline
● The Cafeteria College: Affordable … But at What Cost? ● Costs and Benefits of Guided Pathways
○ Student Pathway Costs ○ Operating Costs, Revenue, and Cost per Completion ○ Transitional and Ongoing Costs ● Policy Incentives to Redesign College for Success ○ Performance Funding ○ Policies for Strengthening Transfer and Career Pathways ● Are Guided Pathways Worth the Cost? ● Are “Bundled” Models More Cost-Effective?

Questions
How do resource models support student persistence/completion at the state, district, and campus level? (pg. 176-181)

Your Responses

How do District policies/processes/practices support funding that does not penalize the “the large numbers of educationally and economically disadvantaged students”? (pg. 185-188)
To close equity gaps and increase student success and persistence, what might Palomar College consider either continuing, stopping, changing, or starting?

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Coffee Talk Book Club: Redesigning America’s Community