Automotive Technology Module 1: Introduction to Automotive


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Introduction To Automotive Technology

Automotive Technology Module 1: Introduction to Automotive Technology
Student Reference

Technical Consultants:
Ken Estes Robin Ferguson
Steve Reese

Produced by the Instructional Materials Laboratory 1400 Rock Quarry Center
University of Missouri-Columbia Columbia, MO 65211 (800) 669-2465
2006 Edition
Catalog no. 70-1801-S © 2006. The Curators of the University of Missouri.
All Rights Reserved.


Project Coordinator: Erica Kassel
Editor: Janis Levsen
Graphic Artists: Chris Benedict Jacqueline Craig

Automotive Technology
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Introduction To Automotive Technology
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The 2006 revision of Introduction to Automotive Technology represents the Instructional Materials Laboratory’s commitment to the continual improvement of the Automotive Technology Curriculum. Introduction to Automotive Technology is the first in the nine-module series. The other modules are as follows:

Module 2 Module 3 Module 3 Module 3 Module 4 Module 5 Module 6 Module 7 Module 8 Module 9

Electrical Systems Engine Performance, Section 1: Ignition Systems Engine Performance, Section 2: Fuel and Exhaust Systems Engine Performance, Section 3: Emission Control Systems Engine Repair Steering and Suspension Systems Brakes Manual Drive Train and Axles Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles Heating and Air Conditioning

All modules are based on the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) task list. For years the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) has set the professional standards for automotive technicians. A strong NATEF orientation makes the nine curriculum guides an effective tool for preparing students to enter the technologically advanced field of automotive technology.

IML gratefully acknowledges the important contribution of the advisory committee:

Roger Donovan, Illinois Central College, East Peoria, IL Ken Estes, Grand River Technical School, Chillicothe, MO Robin Ferguson, Kirksville Vocational Technical School, Kirksville, MO Sam Jeanrenaud, Lee’s Summit, MO Keith Kendrick, John A. Logan College, Carterville, IL Steve Reese, Lewis and Clark Vocational Technical School, St. Charles, MO Ron Tuetken, Lewis and Clark Community College, Godfrey, IL John Walker, Hannibal Area Vocational Technical School, Hannibal, MO Rodney Wolken, Eldon Career Center, Eldon, MO

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Automotive Technology
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Introduction To Automotive Technology
TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction ................................................................................................................. i

Title Page............................................................................................... i

Acknowledgments. ............................................................................ iii

Components.......................................................................................vii

References..........................................................................................viii

Unit I

Careers in the Automotive Field..................................................S 1

Lesson 1: The Automotive Technology Career........................... S 5

Unit II

Safety...............................................................................................S 11

Lesson 1: Protecting Yourself and Others in the Shop............. S 15

Lesson 2: Shop Safety Features and Emergency Procedures....................................................................................... S 35

Lesson 3: Raising and Supporting Vehicles Safely................... S 41

Lesson 4: Federal and State Hazardous Material Regulations...................................................................................... S 49

Unit III

Chemicals and Their Use.............................................................S 59

Lesson 1: Solvents, Soaps, and Cleaning Solutions.................. S 63

Lesson 2: Lubricants and Specialty Chemicals.......................... S 71

Lesson 3: Gases, Asbestos Dust, and Battery Acid................... S 79

Unit IV

Basic Hand Tools...........................................................................S 85

Lesson 1: Types of Wrenches....................................................... S 89

Lesson 2: Types of Screwdrivers and Pliers.............................. S 97

Lesson 3: Types of Hammers, Punches, and Chisels............. S 103



Unit V
Unit VI Unit VII Unit VIII

Automotive Technology
Specialty Tools, Fasteners, and Measuring Tools.................S 107 Lesson 1: Specialty Tools............................................................ S 111 Lesson 2: Fasteners...................................................................... S 119 Lesson 3: Measuring Tools......................................................... S 129 Power Tools and Shop Equipment..........................................S 135 Lesson 1: Power Tools................................................................. S 139 Lesson 2: Shop Equipment......................................................... S 151 Vehicle Information....................................................................S 161 Lesson 1: Service Information and Vehicle Identification................................................................................. S 165 Customer Service.........................................................................S 169 Lesson 1: Customer Service, Work Orders, and Vehicle Preparation...................................................................... S 173

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Introduction To Automotive Technology
COMPONENTS I. Objectives — Each unit is based on objectives that state the measurable
unit and specific behavioral or performance objectives that the student is expected to achieve. Because the objectives of the unit provide direction for the teaching-learning process, the teacher and student need a common understanding of the intent of the objectives. II. Information Sheets — Presented in outline format, the information sheets provide content essential for meeting the cognitive (knowledge) objectives in the unit. The student should study the information sheets before any class discussion or completion of the assignment sheets. The corresponding Student Reference page numbers appear in the upper corner of the Instructor Guide. III. Assignment Sheets — The assignment sheets allow the student to respond to cognitive questions in writing. IV. Job Sheets — The job sheets are designed to guide the student through various key tasks and provide a means for the instructor to evaluate a student’s performance of the task. V. Unit Tests — The unit tests evaluate the student’s knowledge of the material. VI. Student Workbook and Student Test Packet Tracking Sheets — These provide the instructor with an effective way to track student progress on the assignment sheets, job sheets, and unit tests.
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references

Automotive Technology

Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers. www.autoalliance.org.
“Aqueous Parts Cleaning.” Best Environmental Practices for Auto Repair, November 1999. Environmental Protection Agency.
Automotive Lift Institute. www.autolift.org
“Battery Safety.” National Ag Safety Database (NASD). www.cdc.gov/nasd.
Chrysler. www.chrysler.com.
Dodge. www.dodge.com.
Duffy, James E. Modern Automotive Technology. Tinley Park, IL: The Goodheart-Willcox Company, Inc., 2000.
“Floor Cleanup.” Best Environmental Practices for Auto Repair, November 1999. Environmental Protection Agency.
Ford Motor Company. www.ford.com.
General Motors. www.gm.com.
National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). www.natef.org.
National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE). www.asecert.org.
Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2006–07 Edition. United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics. www.bls.gov/oco.
Screw Drive Systems. Sizes.com. www.sizes.com.
Sunkin, Ed. “Trends and Traits of Today’s Technicians: The 2001 Professional Automotive Technicians Survey.” Underhood Service, March 2001.
Tobolt, William K, Larry Johnson, and W. Scott Gauthier. Automotive Encyclopedia. Tinley Park, IL: The Goodheart-Willcox Company, Inc., 2000.
United States Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration. www.osha.gov.
United States Environmental Protection Agency. www.epa.gov.

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Introduction To Automotive Technology
UNIT I: careers in the automotive field CONTENTS OF THIS UNIT I. Unit objective II. Lesson plan
A. Lesson 1: The Automotive Technology Career 1. Information outline 2. Assignment Sheet a. AS1-L1-UI: Automotive Technology Field
III. Unit I Test
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Automotive Technology
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Automotive Technology Module 1: Introduction to Automotive